“The Taste of Sunrise” is a Play from Two Worlds, English and American Sign Language

“The Taste of Sunrise” is a Play from Two Worlds, English and American Sign Language

Florida State College of Jacksonville DramaWorks Review

DramaWorks presented playwright Suzan Zeder’s dynamic and intriguing “The Taste of Sunrise” November 8-11 at Nathan H. Wilson Center for the Arts in Jacksonville. Directed by Professor of Theatre Ken McCulough. It was his 49th production as the head of FSCJ’s Theatre Performance at South Campus. As a critic, I have seen most of his work over the years and have always looked forward to his productions, which ran from musicals to comedy, to serious and have been always entertaining and thought-provoking.

In “The Taste of Sunrise” he presented a play from two worlds with two languages: English and American Sign Language.

The play was set in a town in the Deep South during the years of 1917-1918. The play opened with a baby name Tuc being born deaf because of Scarlet fever. The rest of the play follows Tuc as he grows up adjusting to life and learning sign language along the way. His Father (Gabriel Alexander Pride) is persuaded to send him up North to a prominent school for the blind whose theory for the deaf was forbidding them to use sign language and pushing students only to learn to speak. (An ideology no longer used in this field).

Taste of Sunrise, FSCJ DramaWorks

While he is there, his father dies and he is suddenly an orphan. Tuc meets a young girl Maizie (Cameron Raine Smithgall) who becomes a close friend. Tuc was played by Lance McGlockton, a First Coast Technical College student. His performance was excellent. Tuc never spoke, only signed (something he had to learn to do in this role). Translating his gestures to live words was Allen L. Melton acting as Tuc’s voice. All the hearing actors constantly had someone on stage that would sign what they said; similarly the deaf actors had someone to speak the words they signed.

A number of people came in to Tuc’s life and included Emma (Autumn Franks), Nell Hicks (Betsey Totten Darnell) , Izzy (Erin Stephens), Clovis (Kendric Harris), Hunter 2 (Michael G. Muse), Dr. Graham (Carl Stokes), Dr. Grindly Mann (Angus Reid), Roscoe (Zach Beers), Hunter 1 (Joseph Mercedes), Nurse (Kaitlin Cody), and Patron 1 (Michelle Hamilton).

Taste of Sunrise, FSCJ DramaWorks

Florida State College of Jacksonville has an American Sign Language/English interpreting program and students from this program were among the ever present interpreters on stage for this production. They were Gabriel Babbit, Kristina Clifton, Elizabeth Hunter, Dylan Randall, and Jessica Rzemien. The interpreters were assisted in their roles by Pamela Bernkrant, a Professional Interpreter, Lori Cimino, an Instructional Program Manager for ASL/English Interpreting, James Pope, a Professor of ASL and Amy L. Ryals, a Language Consultant.

The technical aspects added much to the enjoyment of this play. Award Winning Scenic and Lighting Designer Johnny Pettergrew along with this staff and the students in the technical classes at FSCJ produced an excellent setting for this play. A floor to ceiling backdrop against the rear wall flashed colorful photos of settings germane to the action of the play.

Taste of Sunrise, FSCJ DramaWorks

“The Taste of Sunrise” is the middle play in playwright Suzan Zeder’s “Ware Trilogy, a series about the complexities of deafness that took her thirty years to complete. “Mother Hicks” and “The Edge of Peace” are the 2nd and third parts of this trilogy. The final play has Tuc going back home , still deaf of course but is able to make a living doing odd jobs and as a mechanic.

I thought that this play would have been one performed in St. Augustine, Florida since it is the home of the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind. It was obvious that this is an expensive play to do and FSCJ is to be commended for the fine actors and outstanding production. Twelve hundred students from the St. Augustine school attended a performance as special guests of the Wilson Center.

PRODUCTION TEAM

Ken McCulough (Director), Johnny Pettegrew (Scenic & Lighting Design), The Costume Crew (Costume Design), Bob Rupp (Scene Shop Supervisor), Mike Wills (Sound Design), Brandon Gelinas (Sound Assistant) , Grace Guevarez (Stage Manager), Adis Alic & Sierria Henry (Assistant Stage Managers), Tara Paige (Poster Design & Program Layout), Brenna Anderson & Elizabeth Stermer (Property Supervisors)

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/11/13/the-taste-of-sunrise-florida-state-college-of-jacksonville-dramaworks/


REVIEW: ‘Savannah Sipping Society’ Opens at Theatre Jacksonville

Savannah Sipping Society, Hillary Hickam at Theatre Jacksonville
Hillary Hickam

Theatre Jacksonville opened the first production of its 99 season on November 2 with The Savannah Sipping Society. It will run through November 18th at 2032 San Marco Ave. Call 904-396-4425 for reservations.

This play is by the writing team of Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope and Jamie Wooten or better known as Jones Hope Wooten. These three former TV sitcom writer s have created their comedy scenarios for several years and their combined plays have close to 4,000 performances. Two of their plays are well known to Jacksonville audiences, The Dixie Swim Club at the Alhambra Theatre and Always a Bridesmaid right here at Theatre Jacksonville.

This is a comedy about four unattached mature women who meet by chance in Savannah, Georgia and spend the next six months developing deep friendships. Three of them met briefly at an exercise gym, then move on to the lovely home owned by Randa Covington and a fourth woman joins them in their “sipping” sessions of various alcoholic drinks as they plan various adventures together.

Savannah Sipping Society, Abigail Hunger, Hillary Hickam and Kelley Norman at Theatre Jacksonville
Abigail Hunger, Hillary Hickam and Kelley Norman

Hillary Hickam is Randa, a very qualified professional architect who is currently out of a job and income. She owns the very lovely house that has a veranda where most of the action takes place. The set by TJ Designer and Technical Tim Watson is gorgeous and you will want to move in. Ms. Hickam’s home is in Jacksonville but she has performed on stage and in film all over the USA. Jacksonville audiences have seen her remarkable performances as Marsha in Vanya and Sonia and Marsha and Spike and as Karen in August, Osage County at Players by the Sea.

Kelley Norman is Dot, the most senior of the four women. Dot is a widow and recently lost her husband and now worries about retirement. Mrs. Norman is very convincing in this role. She has been a teacher in Macclenny, Florida for 38 and one of the mainstays of the Baker County Community Theatre. Theatre audiences are very familiar with her daughter Sara Beth Summers an award winning actress on Jacksonville stages.

Marlafaye, the woman who moved to Savannah from Texas is played by Abigail Hunger in her 3rd performance at Theatre Jacksonville. As Lala she was the funniest actor in The Last Night of Ballyhoo. Then in a complete reversal, she was the very serious Anne Boleyn in Wolf Hall. She is back to her unique comic ways in this show and is very funny, as a women who lost her dentist husband to his pretty much younger dental hygienist but is planning her revenge on her ex husband. Miss Hunger dresses strangely in this role and has long black hair that looks like a dead squirrel.

Savannah Sipping Society, Kelley Norman, Sommer Farhat, Hillary Hickam at Theatre Jacksonville
Kelley Norman, Sommer Farhat, Hillary Hickam

Actress Sommer Farhat is Jinx, a life coach who plans many of the adventures taken by these four ladies. Ms. Farhat has been in many plays on TJ’s stage, both comedy and serious roles. She has a role of some authority in this play; she speaks in a clear voice that is remarkable that came in loud and clear to me sitting beyond the middle of the theatre.

One final cast member has a cameo role as Grandmother Covington that is comic and brief. Barbara Stevenson is line perfect since she has no dialogue at all.

Jason Collins directed this play and the program listed his many directing accomplishments all over this city. He is also a fine actor and has performed in variety of roles and he really loves comedy. Jason is a member of the inprov group, the Awkward Silence.

Savannah Sipping Society, Abigail Hunger, Sommer Farhat, Kelley Norman and Hillary Hickam at Theatre Jacksonville
Abigail Hunger, Sommer Farhat, Kelley Norman and Hillary Hickam

This show marks the Jacksonville debut of Costume Designer, Amanda Moore, who went to school in Gainesville and her costume accomplishments are well known there. She will be back, she is good. Miss Moore had these ladies changing clothing many times to show the passage of 6 months time in their lives. And I was impressed with the wardrobe selections for everyone.

The open night audience consisted of mainly married couples who loved this show and laughed long and hard all evening long. As I sat there, I thought it was exciting to be drawn into a comedy in which female characters are the driving force. 2018 is truly the year of the women. Many are running for political offices all over the country. Women have exercised their rights in the work place! This play is funny and shows us the potency and power of friendships in our lives. Don’t miss this show; it is well worth a little over 2 hours of your time.

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/11/06/review-savannah-sipping-society-theatre-jacksonville/


REVIEW: Jacksonville University College of Fine Arts Delights Audiences with “Into the Woods”

Jacksonville University College of Fine Arts, Into the Woods

Jacksonville University presented four performances of James Lapine’s award winning musical “Into The Woods” from November 1 to 4 at Swisher Theatre.

This musical won three Tony Awards on Broadway in 1987. It was made into a movie in 2014 with Meryl Streep and Johnny Depp and grossed over 200 million dollars at the box office.

This is one of the most unique musicals in that the script combines several fairy tales into one story with the paths of familiar characters crossing and changing their lives. The cast is large and it takes a skilled Director Kimberly Beasley to keep all those hoops in the air without losing sight of the lives of the characters.

Jacksonville University College of Fine Arts Delights Audiences with “Into the Woods”

JU musicals are known for having wonderful voices in their musicals and there was a stage full of excellent well trained actors and singers. In addition to singing the cast engaged in witty word play and well-executed physical comedy.

The first act concerns a baker (Axel Berry) and his wife (Isabella Martinez) who have no children due to a curse placed on them by The Witch (Emily Pate) that requires them to obtain four items to lift the spell. They must find a white cow, the red cap of Red Riding Hood (Kelly Wolfe), hair the color of corn from Rapunzel (Jackie Glassman) and a slipper pure as gold.

Jacksonville University College of Fine Arts Delights Audiences with “Into the Woods”

Many characters are encountered as the action progresses including Cinderella (Shauna Clark), her mother (Candace Dickens), her step mother (Sarah Stepp), Florinda (Melissa Allen), Lucinda (Andrea Vilarino), Jack of bean stalk fame (Joshua Andrew), Jack’s Mother (Alexandra Gravine), Rapunzel (Jackie Glassman), Rapunzel’s Prince (Nic Gonzales), Granny (Cailyn Cook), Steward (Abrien Nelson) ,Snow White(Kalei Dela Cruz) and Sleeping Beauty (Rachel Sandowski). Christopher Mandel plays Cinderella’s Prince and the Wolf. Joseph Mahoney is the Narrator and Mysterious Man. The voices of Nati Gonzales as the Giant, and Cinderella’s father (Ben Beck), are heard over the sound system.

All come to realize that their hopes and dreams have not been fulfilled; the lesson learned is that actions have consequences and we must go “into the woods: and confront them.

This musical is the very first performed with computer generated music rather than a live JU orchestra. Under expertise of Music Director Benjamin Beck it sounded excellent. This was also training for those cast members who are planning to go into professional theatre upon graduation since many theatre to control cost use similar systems now.

The only glitch technically was when a microphone of the Narrator went dead in Act I and it was difficult to hear him above the music. He came back with a new mike in Act II and that was appreciated by audience applause.

Jacksonville University College of Fine Arts Delights Audiences with “Into the Woods”

Scenic Designer, Brandon Lettow,  filled the stage with hugh tree trunks to create an interesting forest. Lighting Designer Austin Kelm further presented a foreboding forest.

Costume Designer Curtis Williams created the authentic fanciful and colorful costumes.

The cast, besides having such talent voices that handled Stephen Sondheim’s amazingly complex lyrics and music, presented enjoyable witty word play and well-executed physical comedy and thus a musical that was uproariously entertaining.

Coming up in the spring, JU will present another well known musical “Legally Blonde”. Plan to see that one for sure. JU and Swisher always take a commendable and flexible approach to theater prices that everyone can afford.

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/11/07/jacksonville-university-college-of-fine-arts-into-the-woods/


REVIEW: Wait Until Dark at All Beaches Experimental Theatre

ABET, Wait Until Dark

ABET, All Beaches Experimental Theatre, opened its second production of the season, at his new home 544 Atlantic Blvd, Neptune Beach with the classic thriller, Wait Until Dark. This play by Frederick Knott debuted in 1966 and ran for 373 performances. It had star power with Lee Remick in the lead for which she was nominated for a Tony Award. Warner Bros-Seven Arts made a movie that starred Audrey Hepburn who won an Academy Award for her role.

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This play is an electrifying thriller about a young lady named Susy who is blind due to an auto accident. While in the hospital she meets and marries a freelance photographer Sam (Kyle Reeves) and they live in a small basement apartment. The time is the 1990s.

This nail-biting drama finds three con men intruding into the blind Suzy’s home while Sam is away on a photo assignment. It seems that when in Canada on assignment, Sam accidently brought home a doll which unknown to him is stuffed with high grade heroin and these three bad boys of society want it so badly they would kill to get it.

ABET, Wait Until Dark

While Susy is out shopping, the trio of crooks meets in her apartment. Here we met the head of this trio is Harry Roat Jr. In some very interesting casting, Roat is played by a woman, Milan Alley who arrives wearing a long shoulder length wig, shorts and rose colored glasses. Ms. Alley is from Tallahassee, Florida and made her local debut as a singer in one of the major roles in Madam Bonaparte at Players by the Sea. She also played by two roles dressed as a male in this play and we leave those for your to discover when you see the show. Alley more than captures the psychopathic energy of the villain Mr. Roat.

One of her or his criminals is Mike Talman played by David Girard who is well known for his many outstanding performances on local stages. Mike agrees to visit Susy and pretend that he is an old army buddy of Sam’s and is just passing through the city. He spends his time looking for the doll while talking it up with Susy.

ABET, Wait Until Dark

Conman # 2 is Juan Ocharan who pretends to be Sergeant Carlino of the local police department investigating a murder of a woman in the neighborhood. He of course is looking everywhere for the doll. Mr. Ocharan is doing his first non singing role; has been a student in the UNF chorale.

Another character is the young neighborhood girl Gloria, who lives upstairs, who is a good friend to Susy. Nine years old Tatum Matthews is an excellent actress and very entertaining and engaging in this key role involved in dealing with these undesirable thugs. This is Tatum’s first non-musical role, and she has sung in several musicals at Alhambra Theatre and Dining. She has been cast in the upcoming production of Elf at the Alhambra.

ABET, Wait Until Dark

Actress Jenna Bourne, in the most demanding role of her acting career, is very convincing as a blind woman. She impressed us with her constant attention to finding her way at home as some who has no sight. Facially she expresses the fear, doubt and desperation that she finds herself in and then expertly turns things around in her favor for a thrilling hold-your-breath finish.

Franklin Ritch makes his directing debut with this show. He has been a performer in 3 musicals on local stages with Into the Woods and Madam Bonaparte at Players by the Sea and Celebration at ABET. Mr. Ritch also designed the set that is outstanding considering the small amount of space he had to work with and the incredible number of items on it.

The title of the show is Wait Until Dark, and to forewarn you. Yes, you sit in the dark in the 2nd act, with parts of the show being done in with the lights out but it lasts a very short time.

Don’t miss this true classic of theatre that will keep you spellbound. Call for reservations 904-249-7177 or visit www.abettheatre.com

PRODUCTION TEAM

Franklin Ritch (Director), Ramona Ramdeen (Stage Manager), Maureen Johnson (Assistant Stage Manager), Laura Young (Properties), Bryan Frank (Light/Sound Design) Hunter Steinke (Backstage Crew)

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/11/06/review-wait-until-dark-at-all-beaches-experimental-theatre/


BEHIND THE SCENES OF THE ALHAMBRA’S 1776

BY DICK KEREKES

          New York actors aspire to win a Tony, film actors want to win an Oscar. What do Jacksonville community theatre actors covet most? A role on stage at the Alhambra Dinner Theatre.

          An actor may perform with every theatre group in town, doing a variety of roles but when they finally land a role at the longest-producing dinner theatres in America, Jacksonville’s Alhambra Theatre, you have reached the top in this area.

          Why? As Jacksonville’s full time professional theatre, you know you can perform with the pros. I know this question comes to mind. You thought the Alhambra is an equity house using actors from the actor’s union known as Equity. That is true, but Equity has an agreement with dinner theaters that allows them to use a certain percentage of non-union actors in each production. This is like an apprentice program, developing new actors and giving them an opportunity to earn their equity card by performing so many hours.

wed17oct(oct 17)7:00 pmsun18nov(nov 18)10:00 pm1776 A MUSICAL REVOLUTION7:00 pm – (november 18) 10:00 pm Alhambra Theatre & Dining

          The cast of the current production of the wonderful “l776” has 25 actors and when you read the playbill you will see that Director Tod Booth has selected a number of non-union performers who are making their Alhambra debuts in this play. Some of the new performers are even new to me, as they came from other cities for the opportunity to advance their careers and get “1776” on their resumes.

          The Alhambra performs many musicals and if you audition for one of them, you had better have a better-than-average singing voice that is for sure. The voices in the current production are excellent and when all the men on stage sing together, it seems like the roof of the theatre rises a bit.

          Coming from community theatre to do a show, you immediately notice that the rehearsals to get the show ready are much shorter. Most productions run at least a month, and the only day off you will get will be Monday when the theatre is usually dark. On Saturday and Sunday you may have 2 shows each day.If the musical is one that children like, you may also have a mid-week matinee show as well.

          The current “1776” is loaded with talent. Lee Hamby and Kenneth Uibel are two actors in this show who are doing the exact same roles on this very same stage in April l999, or 20 years ago. Kurt McCall who plays John Hancock is a local actor who earned his equity card through the Alhambra and as a result has been several shows over the years. Mr. McCall also was a costume designer for the Alhambra several years ago.

          Dave Gowan who plays James Wilson and Kevin Roberts as Caesar Rodney are well known for roles in local theatres and has appeared in other Alhambra productions. Rodney Holmes after three outstanding performances on local stages is now in his third Alhambra show in a row as the courier for the Continental Congress. If you go to community theatres, the names of three actors will be familiar to you. Brice Cofield, Alec Hadden and Neal Thorburn all make impressive debuts as first timers on the Alhambra stage in “l776”

          Want to be on the stage of the Alhambra? Then prepare. Do as many community theatre plays as you can. See “l776”, and read the credits of the actors in the show. Contact them for their advice. Most of them have facebook pages and so are easy to contact. Audition! The Alhambra publishes audition notices on their facebook page or check out The Theatre Alliance of Greater Jacksonville on face book for a list of most auditions locally.

          Yours truly did two plays at the Alhambra some years ago in “The Impossible Years” and “The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas”. It was my “Oscar” and my “Tony Award” and if I never act again, I have had my day in the sun. I played with the “pros”.

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/10/30/behind-the-scenes-of-the-alhambras-1776/


1776, A Musical Revolution: Alhambra Theatre and Dining Review

1776: A Musical Revolution Alhambra Theatre and Dining Review

A DUAL CRITICS REVIEW

Jacksonville’s Alhambra Theatre opened the Tony Award-winning musical “1776” on October 17, which will continue through November 18, 2018. The theatre is located at 12000 Beach Boulevard in Jacksonville, Florida. Visit alhambrajax.com or call 904-641-1212 for reservations.

wed17oct(oct 17)7:00 pmsun18nov(nov 18)10:00 pm1776 A MUSICAL REVOLUTION7:00 pm – (november 18) 10:00 pm Alhambra Theatre & Dining

The Alhambra’s timing for staging the production is notable, since our country is involved in mid-term elections which include extensive coverage of all things political by our newspapers and television commentators.

This 1969 musical by Sherman Edwards and Peter Stone is about the drafting, acceptance and signing of the Declaration of Independence, the cornerstone of our liberty. Director Tod Booth has a solid well-chosen cast of 25 to bring the story to life with factual characters, memorable songs, and lively wit.

1776: A Musical Revolution Alhambra Theatre and Dining Review

The story takes us back to, of course, 1776, when delegates from the thirteen existing states met as the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia in the Pennsylvania State House during a sweltering summer. Their purpose was to formalize the union of the states and their separation from Great Britain. Many theatergoers will see the play as a sizzling recreation of our American heritage, which they learned about in less-lively history classes. And younger members of the audience will marvel at the period costumes, (brilliantly selected by the Costume Crew).

The Congressional leaders and the principals in the musical were John Adams from Massachusetts and his opponents. Adams was portrayed by Kevin Anderson, who has an extensive resume which includes Broadway, West End, television, and film productions. To the audience, Adams is marvelous; the delegates view him as obnoxious and disliked. He teams up with the chatty and amusing Ben Franklin (Mark Poppleton) to convince reluctant delegates to come to a unanimous agreement.

Adams has two principal opponents. Edward Rutledge of South Carolina (Andrew LeJeune) wouldn’t support an early draft of declaration until anti-slavery language was removed, while John Dickinson of Pennsylvania (Alexander Molina) objected to a reference to King George as a tyrant.

1776: A Musical Revolution Alhambra Theatre and Dining Review

Though they make only two appearances, the two women in the cast are striking in both looks and songs. Did Martha Jefferson (Nicole Coffaro) cure the writer’s block experienced by her husband Thomas (Jake Delaney) with a song or with a night of passion? Abigail Adams (Katie Nettle) pops in to sing about her husband John in “He plays the Violin.”

Some of the songs are sad and moving including “Momma Look Sharp” by Rodney Holmes as the courier, and “Molasses to Rum” by Rutledge. Others are humorous. For example “For God’s Sake, John Sit Down” is an admonishment from the participants to Adams, “Piddle, Twiddle, & Resolve” is his response. The most amusing of the musical numbers was “The Egg,” related to the choice of the eagle as a national symbol. And although the musical is better known for its patriotic portrayal rather than its music, it did beat “Hair” for the 1969 Tony Award.

PRINCIPAL DELEGATES

John Adams – Kevin Anderson
John Dickinson –  Alexander Molina
Benjamin Franklin – MarkPoppleton
Thomas Jefferson –Jake Delancy
Edward Rutledge – Andrew LeJeune
John Hancock –Kurt McCall
Dr. Josiah Bartlett – Richard Magyar
Stephen Hopkins – Robin Keith
Roger Sherman – Alex Canty
Lewis Morris – Alec Hadden
Robert Livingston – Thomas Knightingle
Rev. Jonathan Witherspoon – Neal Thornburn
James Wilson – David Gowan
Caesar Rodney-Kevin Roberts
Col. Thomas McKean – Mitchell McCollum
George Read – Joey Swift
Samuel Chase – Lee Hamby
Richard Henry Lee –Travis Gerald Young
Joseph Hewes – Luke Holt
Dr. Lyman Hall –Tom Bengston
Charles Thomsom – Bryce Cofield
Andrew McNair – Kenneth Uibel

The production staff included Tod Booth (Producer/Director), Shain Stroff (Choreographer/ Stage Manager), Cathy Murphy Giddens (Musical Director), Dave Dionne & Ian Black (Set Designers), Pattie Eyler (Properties.)

You may have heard that “Hamilton,” another historical musical, recently won a Tony. Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton,” which was inspired by “1776” will be coming to Jacksonville in 2020 as part of FSCJ’s Artist Series and the Alhambra’s “1776” is a perfect prelude to your historical musical theatre adventures. Don’t miss it.

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/10/24/1776-musical-revolution-alhambra-theatre/


DUAL CRITICS REVIEW: World Premiere of ‘String’ at Jacksonville University College of Fine Arts

Jacksonville University’s Theatre Department presented the World Premiere of “String,” the first full length play in JU’s history written by a current JU student and produced by the theatre department.

Carlos Adorno, who is now in his third year at JU, penned this family drama and also appears on stage as Chris. In the program credits, Adorno credits Professor Brian Palmer, Dr. Tim Snyder, and Professor Erik DeCicco for their assistance in bringing this story to life.

The show is set in New York City, and most of the action occurs in the modest apartment of “Ma,” a middle-aged Hispanic woman, portrayed very realistically by freshman Nati Gonzalez in her first JU production.

As the play opens, we see Ma with Chris (Paul Evans III) and Shakespeare (Owen Betancourt), her two middle-school age sons. Aunty, Ma’s sister, soon arrives with presents for the boys; a remote control truck for Chris and a guitar for Shakespeare. The guitar is related to the play’s title, as much of the play is about Shakespeare’s efforts to become a professional musician. Aunty was portrayed by Zoë Lin Rosas, a JU senior with a number of impressive credits for appearances in JU musicals. We especially remember her as Little Becky Two-Shoes in “Urinetown.”

After a short blackout, the play moves ahead. Chris and Shakespeare are now grown men who continued to live in the same apartment with their mother. Shakespeare, portrayed by Michael Gonzalez, a JU sophomore, is a serious musician and songwriter trying to make a living with his talent. Chris, portrayed by playwright Carlos Adorno, is more business-minded. And while he has a nondescript job, he makes enough money to help his mother supplement her meager income.


`The guys have two friends who visit regularly. Ray (KJ Lindsay-Weston) is a happy-go-lucky buddy who is quite funny. Lin is portrayed by JU graduate Matthew Robertson, who has appeared in several plays in New York. Lin is a tall handsome man, but is somewhat manic and at times bounces around the stage like a rubber ball. He accompanies Shakespeare to The Fat Kat night club where he meets and becomes infatuated with Ally, portrayed by Kristen Oliver, a JU junior who recently appeared in “Mamma Mia” at Theatre Jacksonville. She falls for Lin; he is a bit goofy but is also lots of fun.

A crisis develops when Ma tells Chris she has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Shakespeare becomes very upset when he discovers Ma has told Chris previously and a heated discussion of family finances follows.


And you’re probably wondering if Shakespeare really sings in this show. No, although he pretends he sings. The music we hear off stage is that of Casey Gullede, who composed the music and lyrics for the play. He is a Senior Music Theatre Major at JU.

The next to the last scene has Shakespeare with his bags packed to fly to Florida for a night club tour. When he opens an envelope expecting to find a small royalty check for a record he recently made, he finds a check for $9,000 instead. Since he has a bright financial future, he gives the check to his family to cash.

As critics, we generally do not reveal the endings of plays especially if they have a couple of weeks to run, but since ‘String’ ran only one weekend, here it is: the final scene has family and friends waiting in Ma’s apartment as Shakespeare is flying home from Florida. Suddenly, they learn from a TV announcement that the plane has crashed! Curtain!

Congratulations to Carlos Adorno for this complex play and we hope to see more in the future. It was well cast and splendidly directed by Erik DeCicco. The full house Saturday night audience appeared to really enjoy it.

The creative team included Erik DeCicco (Director), Taylor Crites (Stage Manager), Esther Olivo and Candace Dickens (Assistant Stage Managers), Brandon Lettow (Technical Director), Samantha Catone (Lighting Designer), Brian Champion (Prop Master), Candace Dickens (Sound Designer), and Erik Blomgren (House Manager).

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/10/15/string-jacksonville-university-college-of-fine-arts-review/


REVIEW: ‘Buyer & Cellar’ at 5 & Dime is One of the Funniest One-Person, One-Act Shows You Will Ever See

A DUAL CRITICS REVIEW

The 5 & Dime Theatre Company has opened Buyer & Cellar, one of the funniest one-person one-act shows you will ever have the opportunity to see. The group was founded seven years ago and has consistently staged outstanding productions; this is their second year in their permanent home in Downtown Jacksonville. This outrageously humorous comedy written by Jonathan Tolins opened on October 5th and will remain on stage through October 21, 2018.

fri30novsat01decBuyer & Cellar(november 30) 8:00 pm – (december 1) 10:00 pm The 5 & Dime, A Theatre Company

Mr. Tolins was inspired to write the play after encountering “My Passion for Design,” a lavish coffee table book by Barbra Streisand published in 2010. Ms. Streisand, now in her seventies, has captivated audiences throughout the world during her remarkable career as a singer, actress, and movie director. Tolins makes a point of admitting that his depiction of Barbra as presented in his play is complete fiction.

“Buyer & Cellar” at 5 & Dime Reintroduces Bradley Aker’s to Center Stage

Alex, the principle character, is portrayed by local actor/director Bradley Akers in a tour de force performance. Alex is a hard-luck Los Angeles actor, who lost his job at Disneyland, and has been hired as the only employee of a make-believe mall in the cellar of Streisand’s home. And yes, Barbra does have a mini-mall with storefronts and shops in her mansion’s cellar, which she uses to display her costumes, dolls, and other collections (google “streisand mall images” for photos).  Alex spends his day tidying up, dusting, and walking around the mall, while waiting for Streisand, the only customer who patronizes the shops.

“Buyer & Cellar” at 5 & Dime Reintroduces Bradley Aker’s to Center Stage

But it’s not all waiting around for Bradley Akers in his role as Alex; it’s a one-man show with multiple characters, who include Barbra, her housekeeper, her husband James Brolin, and Alex’s boyfriend Barry.

One of the most humorous incidents concerns a doll named Fifi. While acting as a customer, Barbra successfully bargains with Alex to obtain a better price for the doll, which puzzles Alex, as all the items in the mall belong to her.

Projections on a screen on the back wall were used to show photos of Hollywood and TV greats in glorious or inglorious moments, which garnered much laughter.

“Buyer & Cellar” at 5 & Dime Reintroduces Bradley Aker’s to Center Stage

Mr. Akers is marvelous as he tells his story, using varied voices, facial gestures, and spirited body movements to captivate his audience in this demanding production. While this is his first appearance as an actor in five years, he has appeared in many roles on our local stages in the past. As a teenager, he directed Dog Sees God at Players by the Sea, which was chosen as best play of the year. Since then he has been in demand as a director and has an impressive list of work, which includes comedies, dramas, and musicals at Jacksonville Beaches’ Players by the Sea, St. Augustine’s Limelight Theatre, and The 5 & Dime. Of note, while Bradley is starring in this show, his wife Sadie is also starring as Sally Bowles in Limelight’s production of Cabaret.

“Buyer & Cellar” at 5 & Dime Reintroduces Bradley Aker’s to Center Stage

The set was elegant and striking, with white walls, flooring, and furniture accented with black patterns.

The play was expertly directed by Lee Hamby, one of the founders of The 5 & Dime, who also serves as the theatre’s Production Manager. With Hamby’s direction, superb acting by Akers, and a hilarious script, we had an evening of zany fun. As part of our research for this play, we briefly viewed You Tube selections of the Broadway production, and concluded that Bradley Akers’ performance was Broadway quality.

The production crew included: Lee Hamby (Director & Set Design); Abby Gomez (Production Manager & Stage Manager); Mike Yarick (Projection Design); Katie Cress (Lighting Design); Bob Chapman (Set Construction);  Jennifer Peek and Frank Sanabria (Scenic Painting).

The 5 & Dime Theatre is located at 112 East Adams Street; additional information is available on the company’s Facebook page. For reservations, call (904) 637-5100 or visit www.The5andDime.org.

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/10/08/buyer-cellar-5-dime-theatre-review/


CABARET LIMELIGHT THEATRE REVIEW

fri21sep7:30 pmsun21oct9:30 pmCABARET7:30 pm – (october 21) 9:30 pm Limelight Theatre

A DUAL CRITICS REVIEW by Dick Kerekes & Leisla Sansom

St. Augustine’s Limelight Theatre opened a revival of “Cabaret” (September 20 – October 21, 2018) on the Matuza Mainstage. The theatre is located at 11 Old Mission Avenue; ample free parking is available. Visit limelight-theatre.org or call 904-825-1164 for reservations.

John Kander and Fred Ebb created this enduring musical, which received eight Tony awards after opening on Broadway in 1966. A film adaptation followed in 1972, which received eight Academy Awards. The story explores the rise of the Nazi Party in pre-World War II Germany, and is as relevant today as when it debuted over fifty years ago.

As you enter Limelight for your seat, you will find yourself welcomed to the decadent Kit Kat Klub with the Emcee’s “Willkommen.”

Afterward, we meet struggling would-be writer Cliff Bradshaw, an American who has come to Berlin hoping to complete his first novel. He is befriended by the older affable Ernst Ludwig, who recommends a cheap boarding house along with a visit to the Kit Kat Klub, which he describes as one of the hottest places in the city. Cliff is excellently portrayed by Brian Matthews, a Flagler College graduate and award-winning actor for his appearance in “The Maids” at the Kennedy Center.

After getting settled in his new quarters, Cliff is off to the club, where he meets Sally Bowles, a young British singer who is the featured performer; he offers to take her home, but she declines, saying it would make Max, her boyfriend and the club’s owner, jealous. However, she shows up at Cliff’s home the next day. She’s been fired, and has nowhere else to go. Cliff allows her to move in and their ill-fated romance begins. Sally, as portrayed brilliantly by Jacksonville actress Sadie Akers, is a complex character who sizzles as a singer, dresses conservatively on and off stage, and is addicted to drugs, liquor, and sex. And unlike Cliff, she is totally oblivious to what’s happening to Germany.



Mike Beaman appears as The Emcee, who bursts upon the stage with a razor-sharp delivery filled with macabre gaiety, insinuating invitations, and gymnastics. He was initially fully dressed but later more or less bare-chested. “Two Ladies,” his song and dance number with two Kit Kat girls was very well done. And while Beaman has an extensive theatrical background as an instructor and director, this is reportedly his first on-stage appearance in five years. 

A touching subplot concerns Fraulein Schneider (Regina Torres) who is carrying on a gentle love affair with Herr Schultz (Post to Post Links II error: No post found with slug “Leonard Alterman”), the Jewish owner of a small fruit store. Both are well known for their appearances on our local stages. They sing the lovely song “Married” in anticipation of their wedding, but we soon learn that their romance faces a tragic end as the Nazi movement expands; Schneider insists they part after an unknown assailant throws a brick through Schultz’s window.

Elizabeth Bricknell provided a lot of the humor in this play as Fraulein Kost, the singing prostitute who loves sailors. Bob Mandzi is Ernst Ludwig, who smuggles money to support the Nazis from France.

The show has a great supporting cast. The very sexy Kit Kat Girls are portrayed by Francesca Bellavista, Samantha Jenkins, Bridgid Mullen, Izabella Unice, and Kimberly Zielinski. The Kit Kat Boys are portrayed by Caden Walters, Julien Dournaux and Isaiah Balzer (also Max). All appear frequently as dancers.            

Limelight has a special performer in this show in Sascha Thorpe as Singing Boy, who belts out several lines of “Tomorrow Belongs to Me.” He began acting when he was six years old; he is now nine years old and has an impressive resume.

The band performed on an elevated platform on stage and included Sean Carroll-James Taylor (Woodwinds), Mitch Kolesaire (Bass), Brooks Clarke (Guitar/Banjo), and Lukas Weber (Drums). Shelli Long (Music Director) has been with Limelight for fourteen years; she also serves as Properties Mistress for the shows.

The production was directed by Beth Lambert with Harolyn Sharpe as Assistant Director. Missy Schmotzer choreographed the striking dance numbers. This is her second show for Limelight; she debuted with “Heathers: The Musical.” Bethany Paolini as Costume Designer created the edgy costumes. Lights designed by Carl Liberatore had a large role as part of the action. Jennifer Farrow kept all of this together as the Stage Manager.

We appreciated this interesting and unique production. The show is a reminder of a past we don’t want to forget, a past filled with terrorism, a play that merits repeated viewing. We highly recommend Limelight’s version; it is well acted and wonderfully sung.  

 

 

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/09/26/cabaret-limelight-theatre-review/


JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH ABET THEATRE REVIEW

A DUAL CRITICS REVIEW by Dick Kerekes & Leisla Sansom

We attended the festive debut of the brand new home of the All Beaches Experimental Theatre at 544 Atlantic Boulevard in Neptune Beach, Florida on Friday, September 22, 2018. The theatre was founded by Carson Merry Baillie a number of years ago and named the Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre; their new name reflects their more expansive audience. Their new home is located in the Neptune Beach Plaza; excellent parking and pre-show dining opportunities are within walking distance. We were greeted with smiles by ABET’s Managing Artistic Director Ceila Frank and ABET board members.

fri21sep(sep 21)8:00 pmsun30(sep 30)4:00 pmFeaturedJAMES & THE GIANT PEACHNew ABET Location 8:00 pm – 4:00 pm (30) ALL BEACHES EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE

The opening show for the venue and the new season is “James and the Giant Peach”, a musical adaptation of a children’s book by Roald Dahl. He has written a number of children’s books; “Matilda” and “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” were also adapted for the stage. The choice was excellent as it is a show appeals to both children and adults.

The show’s director is Lee Hamby, who is well known in this area as a director, designer, and actor. He is very much in demand for his talents and was the perfect choice for launching this endeavor. Lee is the managing director and founder of downtown Jacksonville’s highly successful 5 & Dime Theatre Company,

This delightful version of Dahl’s work was staged using a large screen on the back wall with projected images to provide the multiple settings, and recorded music. Amy Hancock’s colorful innovative costumes reflected a time and place filled with fantastic happenings. The large cast moved on and off stage with perfect timing.

The story is about James, an orphaned boy, performed wonderfully by Shauna Clark, who previously appeared in a number of productions at Jacksonville University. James is forced to live with two repulsive (but terribly funny) sisters Auntie Sponge (Leanne Gullo) and Auntie Spiker (Erin Barnes) who clearly have no maternal instincts whatever and make his life wretched by treating him as an unpaid menial laborer.

Life improves after he accepts a magic potion offered to him by Ladahlord (Brian Niece, who also acts as the play’s narrator). After James sprays an old fruit tree with the potion, the tree responds by growing a giant peach, and the aunts become very excited about the commercial possibilities of this wonder. However, when James tells him he made the peach grow, they don’t believe him and send him outside to sleep as a punishment for lying.

To escape the cold, James makes his way inside the peach and finds it inhabited by human-sized insects who become his friends. The colorfully garbed creatures include Jacob Pickering (Grasshopper), Christine Phillips (Ladybug), Gary Baker (Earthworm), Michael Yarick (Centipede), and Sade Crosby (Spider), and they all also want to escape from the aunts.        

Centipede detaches the peach from the tree, and it rolls into the ocean. The group travels inside across the ocean evading sharks and other hazards, finally arriving in New York City with the help of friendly seagulls. They have survived many dangers, but learned teamwork, became the best of friends, and created a happy ending.

Cast members in the large ensemble appear in a number of smaller roles and are constantly on and off stage with props and costumes, which include those of the sharks and seagulls, as well as assorted crowd members. The ensemble included Kimberly Cooper York, Jack Niemczyk, Karen Couglin, Rhodie Jackson, Kenggy Bravo, Amanda Jackson and Bryan Martins.

Director Hamby has a noteworthy support team with Benjamin Beck (Music Director); Niki Stokes (Choreography); Amy Hancock (Costume Design); Jennifer O’Brien (Assistant Director/Stage Manager); Katie Cress (Light/Sound Operator); Bryan Frank (Light/Sound Design); and Jenn Peek and Frak Sanabria (Scenic Artists).

To close the evening ABET held a reception featuring delicious food and beverages, a tradition maintained for many years.

Many thanks go to the sponsors of this production: John and Beverly Johnson and The Tom Nehl Fund of the Community Foundation of Northeast Florida.

ABET is known for intimate theatre, and we can continue to expect many interesting productions in the future. “James” will remain on stage through September 30, followed by “Wait Until Dark” (October 26 —November 11). Call 249-7177 or visit abettheatre.com for tickets and additional information.

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/09/24/james-and-the-giant-peach-abet-theatre-review/


‘ARSENIC AND OLD LACE’ THEATRE JACKSONVILLE REVIEW

A DUAL CRITICS REVIEW by Dick Kerekes & Leisla Sansom

Theatre Jacksonville began the 2018-19 season with the staging of Joseph Kesselring’s “Arsenic and Old Lace” as the selection for its annual Classic in San Marco series (September 14 —30, 2018). Good reviews followed the play’s debut in 1941 and it has remained popular. It is one of the best dark comedies of all time; a comedy filled with hilarious frenzied activity, and the funniest play we have seen this year.

fri14sep(sep 14)7:30 pmsun30(sep 30)9:00 pmFeaturedARSENIC AND OLD LACE7:30 pm – 9:00 pm (30) Theatre Jacksonville

As we waited for the opening scene, we were impressed by the interior of the Brooklyn mansion created by Tim Watson, the theatre’s Scenic, Lighting and Technical Director. The setting, which portrays a combined dining and living room with a set of stairs leading to a second floor, is beautifully rendered.

The home belongs to two elderly sisters, Abby and Martha Brewster, portrayed by award-winning actors Simone Aden-Reid and Gayle Featheringill. Both have graced our local stages for many years. The sisters are delightful; gentle, and soft-spoken while ironically humorous. They share a secret mission: they offer to rent lodging in their spacious home to lonely elderly men and then serve elderberry wine laced with arsenic to those who accept. The sisters view the hastening of death as an act of charity which ends loneliness.

After each death, the sisters tell their wacko nephew Teddy they’ve discovered still another yellow fever victim, and he buries the body in the cellar. Teddy believes he is President Theodore Roosevelt, believes that the staircase leading to his room is San Juan Hill, and frequently acts out this delusional fantasy by playing loud blasts on his bugle, yelling “Charge,” and rushing up the stairs. C. Michael Porter, who looks very much like the real Teddy Roosevelt, is hilarious in what is his thirteenth role on Theatre Jacksonville’s stage.

The only normal person in this family is Mortimer Brewster, brilliantly played by Rich Pintello. Well — almost normal — Mortimer is a theatre critic for a local paper who hates theatre. He often takes the easy way out by writing his reviews while riding in a taxi on his way to see the play. When he learns about the activities of Abby, Martha, and Teddy, he does enough double takes to disjoint his body for life.

Sara Beth Gerard-Summers appears as Elaine Harper, Mortimer’s fiancée, who is charming and stylish and shows off some fantastic glamour-girl dresses.

photo: Maya Adkins

Things become complicated when Jonathan, a sinister long-lost brother, arrives with his personal plastic surgeon and buddy in crime. They plan to remain and open a clinic offering facelifts to local criminals. Jonathan is portrayed by Alec Hadden, who has an outstanding voice; past performances have included singing the national anthem at major sporting events. Jonathan is indeed scary, he is menacing, mercurial, has multiple scars from botched facial surgery, and has killed twelve people. Kerry Burke-McCloud, making his Theatre Jacksonville debut as Dr. Einstein, is convincing as a hardened criminal.

We won’t go further into the story, other than to say madness ensues. Much of the frantic fun is because of the supporting cast members. Brad Trowbridge, a thirty-year veteran of TJ’s stage, has a wonderful cameo role as Mr. Witherspoon. Jim Warren, in another cameo role as a lonely man seeking lodging, was excellent. We recall seeing Jim previously in his award-winning role in Limelight’s “Grapes of Wrath.” The Rev. Dr. Harper, Elaine’s father, is played by Gary Lee Webber, who appeared as Atticus Finch in TJ’s “To Kill A Mockingbird.” He was perfectly cast for this show; he is the Pastor of Southside Baptist Church in real life.

We have seen this play several times and this production was notable for its convincing portrayal of police officers. The cast members were Kris Fabbro (Officer Klein), Tyler Hammond (Officer O’Hara), Matt King (Officer Brophy), and Brandon Kraut (Officer O’Hara); they looked like and acted like well-meaning policemen.

The marvelous costumes reflecting a past era were created by Curtis J. Williams.

Joe Kemper directed this production of “Arsenic and Old Lace” to perfection. He is the instructor of Musical Theatre at Douglas Anderson School of the Arts, and is in demand for his directing talents at theatres in Jacksonville and St. Augustine. After Kemper directed “The Maids” at St. Augustine’s Flagler College in 2016, the play was taken to the Kennedy Center’s American College Theatre Festival and he received two distinguished directing awards. We have seen several of his plays and were impressed by both his direction and his exceptional ability to select cast members who truly fit their assigned roles.

When you see the show, you will receive what is possibly the most comprehensive program you have ever seen. Since the play is TJ’s Classic, it contains a study guide, excellent biographies, and everything you could ever want to know about Joseph Kesselring and the history of his play.



The production team included Joe Kemper (Director), Tim Watson (Scenic Design), Curtis J. Williams (Costume Designer), Brady Corum (Assistant Technical Director), Mae Davis (Stage Manager), Lauren Vonder Muehll (Assistant Stage Manager), Audie Gibson (Light Board Operator), Mae Davis (Sound Board Operator), and Gayle Featheringill (Properties).

Next up for Theatre Jax is a fundraiser to kick off its 99th season. There will be three shows offered on Saturday, October 13, 2018, and you can get tickets for one, two, or all three productions.

The first show begins at 2:00 pm; Ken Fallin, a nationally known celebrity caricaturist and Jacksonville native, will entertain in “Show and Tell” as he recounts highlights of his career.

The second show begins at 4:30 pm; Sarah Boone pays homage to the fair-haired leading ladies of classic film musicals in “Hollywood Blondes.”

The third show begins at 7:30 pm; Linda Purl celebrates the great ladies of the night club era in “Midnight Caravan.”

For reservations and additional information, call (904) 396-4425 or visit www.theatrejax.com.

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/09/18/arsenic-and-old-lace-theatre-jacksonville-review/


DO BLACK PATENT LEATHER SHOES REALLY REFLECT UP? ALHAMBRA THEATRE & DINING REVIEW

A DUAL CRITICS REVIEW by Dick Kerekes & Leisla Sansom

Jacksonville’s Alhambra Theatre revives one of the most popular shows it has ever done with the staging of “Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up?” This musical about eight Catholic school students in the 1950’s debuted in 1979 and is based on an earlier novel by John Powers; he subsequently wrote the book for the play, while James Quinn and Alaric Jans added music and lyrics. The Alhambra’s production opened on September 12 and runs through October 11, 2018.

wed12sep(sep 12)7:30 pmsun07oct(oct 7)10:00 pmFeaturedDO BLACK PATENT LEATHER SHOES REALLY REFLECT UP?7:30 pm – (october 7) 10:00 pm Alhambra Theatre & Dining

At times, we are asked if those of other faiths can enjoy this show: our response is “Yes!” and is based on the block-buster success of  multiple plays and films that include Catholic settings and characters, such as “Nunsence,” “The Sound of Music,” “Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You,” “The Bells of St. Mary’s,” “Boys Town,” and “Sister Act.”

The story relates the educational and coming-of-age experiences of Eddie (Rodney Holmes), Becky (Annabelle Fox), and their friends who live in Chicago’s Southside, where they are attending a traditional Catholic school. The time frame begins with the students entering second grade, and progresses through their senior prom. The audience experiences many firsts in their lives, including  first confessions and first sex education lessons,  We see the confused Eddie and the chubby Becky become a handsome young man and a beautiful young woman; two childhood friends who fall in love only to become best friends going their separate ways afterward.

Three delightful nuns are the hilarious teachers of eight students. Sister Monica (Stephanie Riner), Sister Helen (Jennifer Medure), and Sister Lee (Patti Eyler) sing a little, dance a little, and even roller skate a little as they lead the kids through the growing pains of childhood and adolescence.

Eddie and his pals Felix, Mike, and Louie (Jake Delaney, Joey Swift and Douglas Waterbury-Tieman) are a clowning school-uniformed crew of four. The objects of their blossoming affections and hormones are Becky and her friends Mary, Nancy, and Virginia (Molly Anne Ross, Victoria Elizabeth, and Lindsay Nantz). Watching the transformation of the girls from timid elementary students to boy-friend hungry teenagers is a delight!


Director Booth has added one additional nun to the production: Anthony Felton, a well-known local musical director appears as Sister Mary Upright, who provides musical accompaniment on the piano.

Alhambra veteran Stephen Kane appears as Father O’Reilly, who maintains discipline and bounces books over the heads of the students as he explains about hell’s everlasting fires. He is especially hilarious when he combines hearing confessions with a bit of soft shoe.

The music, which includes such intriguing titles as “Little Fat Girls,” “Cookie Cutters,” “Mad Bombers,” and “How Far is Too Far” is well sung by this talented cast. Be prepared to love their rendition of  “Doo-Wah, Doo Wee.” And “Thank God,” the final song done by the entire company will confirm your belief in things warm and beautiful.

As is usual for a show produced and directed by Tod Booth, you are going to hear some wonderful voices. The leading roles by Mr. Holmes and Ms. Fox were especially well done. The choreography by Shain Stroff was fun to watch, and probably more difficult than it looked for the adult actors portraying kids. Scenic Designers Dave Dionne and Ian Black created some delightful backdrops that reminded us of our own school days, and the roll-around desks were especially fun. The costumes by the Costume Crew were on the mark, with habits for the nuns, school uniforms, and the shockingly oversized black patent leather shoes worn in one of the funniest numbers in the show. It was obvious that the cast was having a lot of fun doing the show.

Additional Production Staff included Cathy Murphy Giddens (Musical Director), Shain Stroff (Stage Manager), Lindsay Nantz (Dance Captain), Daniel Dungan (Lighting Designer), Linnay Bennett (Sound Designer), Patti Eyler (Properties), Luke Holt (Stage Crew), Pierre Tannous (Assistant Stage Manager), and Olivia Chernyshev (Wardrobe Supervisor).

Don’t miss this show; it is one of the funniest of the year. The Alhambra Theatre & Dining is located at 12000 Beach Boulevard in Jacksonville, Florida, and has free parking. Visit alhambrajax.com or call 904-641-1212 for reservations

 

http://eujacksonville.com/2018/09/18/do-black-patent-leather-shoes-really-reflect-up-alhambra-theatre-dining-review/


Upcoming Events

  1. Miami/Brickell Festival of the Arts

    October 20, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - January 15, 2019 @ 6:00 pm UTC+0
  2. Comedian Gerry Dee World Comedy Tour in Naples, Florida

    November 21 @ 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm UTC+0
  3. Ocala Balloon Glow

    November 23 @ 5:00 pm - November 25 @ 10:00 pm UTC+0
  4. 9th Annual Shopapalooza Festival, Part 2

    November 24 @ 10:00 am - 5:00 pm UTC+0
  5. Lake Helen Christmas Parade & Santa’s Village

    November 24 @ 4:00 pm - 9:00 pm UTC+0
  6. Christmas in the Country – Lights Display, Hay Ride & Festival

    November 24 @ 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm UTC+0
  7. Soul Beach: The Outdoor R&b / Jazz Concert & Comedy Show on the Water

    November 24 @ 7:30 pm - November 25 @ 1:00 am UTC+0
  8. 15th Annual X-Country Marathon, 30K, Half-Marathon & 5K

    November 25 @ 7:30 am - 2:30 pm UTC+0
  9. FREE TICKETS! Tampa Improv 11/27 Stand Up Comedy Show

    November 27 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm UTC+0
  10. FL Orchestra Happy Hour Concert – Nov 28

    November 28 @ 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm UTC+0

Upcoming Events

  1. Miami/Brickell Festival of the Arts

    October 20, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - January 15, 2019 @ 6:00 pm UTC+0
  2. Comedian Gerry Dee World Comedy Tour in Naples, Florida

    November 21 @ 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm UTC+0
  3. Ocala Balloon Glow

    November 23 @ 5:00 pm - November 25 @ 10:00 pm UTC+0
  4. 9th Annual Shopapalooza Festival, Part 2

    November 24 @ 10:00 am - 5:00 pm UTC+0
  5. Lake Helen Christmas Parade & Santa’s Village

    November 24 @ 4:00 pm - 9:00 pm UTC+0
  6. Christmas in the Country – Lights Display, Hay Ride & Festival

    November 24 @ 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm UTC+0
  7. Soul Beach: The Outdoor R&b / Jazz Concert & Comedy Show on the Water

    November 24 @ 7:30 pm - November 25 @ 1:00 am UTC+0
  8. 15th Annual X-Country Marathon, 30K, Half-Marathon & 5K

    November 25 @ 7:30 am - 2:30 pm UTC+0
  9. FREE TICKETS! Tampa Improv 11/27 Stand Up Comedy Show

    November 27 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm UTC+0
  10. FL Orchestra Happy Hour Concert – Nov 28

    November 28 @ 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm UTC+0

Join our Fun Network

  1. Miami/Brickell Festival of the Arts

    October 20, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - January 15, 2019 @ 6:00 pm UTC+0
  2. Comedian Gerry Dee World Comedy Tour in Naples, Florida

    November 21 @ 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm UTC+0
  3. Ocala Balloon Glow

    November 23 @ 5:00 pm - November 25 @ 10:00 pm UTC+0
  4. 9th Annual Shopapalooza Festival, Part 2

    November 24 @ 10:00 am - 5:00 pm UTC+0
  5. Lake Helen Christmas Parade & Santa’s Village

    November 24 @ 4:00 pm - 9:00 pm UTC+0
  6. Christmas in the Country – Lights Display, Hay Ride & Festival

    November 24 @ 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm UTC+0
  7. Soul Beach: The Outdoor R&b / Jazz Concert & Comedy Show on the Water

    November 24 @ 7:30 pm - November 25 @ 1:00 am UTC+0
  8. 15th Annual X-Country Marathon, 30K, Half-Marathon & 5K

    November 25 @ 7:30 am - 2:30 pm UTC+0
  9. FREE TICKETS! Tampa Improv 11/27 Stand Up Comedy Show

    November 27 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm UTC+0
  10. FL Orchestra Happy Hour Concert – Nov 28

    November 28 @ 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm UTC+0