Top things to do in Tampa Bay for Thanksgiving week

Top things to do in Tampa Bay for Thanksgiving week

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By Maggie Duffy

Times Staff Writer

Holiday Lights: Displays abound all over the bay area this week, starting Monday with the Winter Village at Tampa’s Curtis Hixon Park. Along with a 360 degree light display set to music, there’s also ice skating and the Winter Village Express. wintervillagetampa.com. Largo has two magnificent displays, one opening at Largo Central Park on Thursday with Ferris wheels, carousel rides, holiday caroling and visits with Santa (free), and Friday, the Florida Botanical Gardens become even more beautiful with twinkly LED lights,plus laser lights and lighted figures, music synchronization, and Florida-style displays ($5 suggested donation). flbg.org.

Thanksgiving Day Races: Earn those extra calories before dinner. In Tampa, the Goody Goody Turkey Gobble is a stroller and dog friendly 8K, 5K or 1-mile out and back race with a post-race breakfast at Amalie Arena ($15-$40; amaliearena.com). The Times Turkey Trot returns to Clearwater, with a buffet of races from the 1-mile Gobbler, to the 10K Turkey Trot, and the turducken of all races, the Clearwater Challenge, with runners doing the 5K, 1 Mile and 10K all in one day. All races begin at Keene Road just south of Gulf to Bay Boulevard ($15-$50). (727) 442-5838.

DATE NIGHT

Music: Monday is futuristic, when a hologram of Roy Orbison is accompanied by a live orchestra at Clearwater’s Ruth Eckerd Hall ($43.25-$73.25). Also Monday, Playboi Carti plays irl at the Ritz Ybor ($35-$70), while Hoobastank rock Clearwater’s Capitol Theater ($29-$59). Friday, former Doobie Brother Michael McDonald performs songs from his new Christmas album at the Capitol Theater ($84-$100). Just down the road, also on Friday, KC and the Sunshine Band get funky at Ruth Eckerd Hall ($50-$150), where Grammy Award-winning band Ghost will play on Sunday ($43.25-$78.75).

Il Divo: The classical crossover vocal group discovered by Simon Cowell bring their brand of operatic pop to St. Petersburg’s Mahaffey Theater on Tuesday ($55-$350). mahaffeytheater.com.

Damon Fowler’s Holiday Blues Bash: The local blues singer and guitarist gathers friends including vocalist Betty Fox, guitarist Sean Chambers and drummer Justin Headley for a jam session at the St. Petersburg’s Palladium Theater on Wednesday ($(18-$38). mypalladium.org.

KIDS AND FAMILY

DRUMline Live Holiday Spectacular: The explosive show brings hot choreography and athletic feats performed by steppers, the rhythmic sounds of trumpets and the speed of pulsating force of the drumline to the Mahaffey Theater on Sunday ($29.50-$59.50). mahaffeytheater.com.

MORE THINGS TO DO

TOP 50: The best restaurants in Tampa Bay

MUSEUMS: How to get into Tampa Bay museums for $10 or less

TOURS: From churches to breweries, 10 behind the scenes tours in Tampa

VIDEO GAME BARS: 13 arcade bars and other places to play in Tampa Bay

INDOORS: 21 places to escape the heat and chill indoors in Tampa Bay

OUTDOORS: 28 ways to have fun outdoors in Tampa Bay

https://www.tampabay.com/things-to-do/top-things-to-do-in-tampa-bay-for-the-week-of-nov-19-25-20181119/


Top things to do in Tampa Bay for Nov. 20

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Category : Event , Tampa Bay

Il Divo: The classical crossover vocal group has released eight albums of operatic pop. 8 p.m., Mahaffey Theater, 400 First St. S, St. Petersburg. $55-$350. (727) 893-7832; mahaffeytheater.com.

Helios Jazz Orchestra: The expanded 21-member Helios Jazz Orchestra presents a show of legendary spy music, joined by singers Jamie Perlow, Andrea Manson, Sonja Spenson, and Ronnie Dee. 7:30 p.m., Palladium Theater, 253 Fifth Ave. N, St. Petersburg. Reserved $25. $35. (727) 822-3590; mypalladium.org.

$10 Tuesdays: The museum is open from until 8 p.m. every Tuesday, featuring $10 admission all day. From 5-8 p.m. enjoy special events in the galleries or find happy hour specials in the Canyon Cafe. 10 a.m., James Museum of Western and Wildlife Art, 150 Central Ave., St. Petersburg. $10. (727) 892-4200.

Winter Village: The riverfront park turns into a winter wonderland with a 360 degree light display set to holiday music, ice skating, the Winter Village Express, 10 pop-up boutiques, food and drink. Hours given are for the ice rink, other hours vary. 4 p.m., Curtis Hixon Park, 600 N Ashley Drive, Tampa. Free (skating/skate rental/trolley additional). (813) 221-3686; wintervillagetampa.com.

KIDS AND FAMILY

Christmas Town at Busch Gardens: More than 2 million twinkling lights transform the park into a holiday wonderland with Rudolph, Christmas-themed entertainment and visits with Santa in his house. Included with admission through Dec. 31. 10 a.m., Busch Gardens, 10165 N McKinley Drive, Tampa. $104, 2 and younger free. Save $15 if you order online. (813) 884-4386; buschgardens.com.

Terrific Tots: Great Explorations brings children ages 1 to 4 a play time with songs, stories, art, movement and toys. 9:45 a.m., Sundial St. Pete, 151 Second Ave. N, St. Petersburg. Free. (727) 800-3201; newbaywalk.com.

TO WATCH

Frontline, 9 p.m., PBS: In the wake of the deadly anti-Semitic attack at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, the program investigates violent white supremacists in “Documenting Hate: New American Nazis.” This includes a neo-Nazi group that has actively recruited inside the U.S. military.

MORE TO EXPLORE

Have relatives in town? Find some diversions at tampabay.com/things-to-do.

https://www.tampabay.com/things-to-do/top-things-to-do-in-tampa-bay-for-nov-20-20181119/


‘Green Book’ is the rare Hollywood crowd-pleaser that triumphs on all counts

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The title of Green Book derives from a period when African-Americans often traveled at their own risk, especially in the Jim Crow South. Unwelcome in many restaurants, hotels and other public establishments, they even faced death in “sundown” towns, where they were warned to get out before evening, or else.

In response, a postal employee named Victor Hugo Green created a guide designed to “give the Negro traveler information that will keep him from running into difficulties, embarrassments and to make his trips more enjoyable.” The Green Book was published for more than 30 years, finally ceasing publication in the late 1960s.

The pain, peril and murderous racism that made the Green Book a necessity of black life seems like unlikely fodder for a crowd-pleaser that plays like gangbusters. But Green Book, a spirited amalgam of buddy comedy, road movie, fish-out-of-water fable and accessible social history, is just that cinematic unicorn.

As an inspiring and thoroughly entertaining chapter drawn from all-too-real life, it mixes authenticity and Hollywood schmaltz with ease that feels both relaxed and judiciously calibrated. Most winningly, Green Book puts two of the finest screen actors working today in a sexy turquoise Cadillac, letting them loose on a funny, swiftly-moving chamber piece bursting with heart, art and soul.

The actors in question are Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali, who prove to be a superbly balanced team. Mortensen plays Tony “Lip” Vallelonga, a Bronx bouncer who in 1962 is making his living at a New York nightclub and trying to avoid working as muscle for the local mob. When he loses his job, he makes ends meet by putting his prodigious appetite to use in a hot dog-eating contest, which even he, being slightly dimwitted, realizes isn’t a sustainable model. Eventually, he answers a call from a Manhattan musician looking for a driver and shows up at his would-be employer’s Carnegie Hall address ready to take anything that pays.

What he finds is a man named Don Shirley (Ali), a supremely elegant pianist and composer who greets Tony draped in regal robes, then conducts the interview from what looks like an ancient Egyptian throne. Shirley, a favorite of Park Avenue and other well-heeled precincts, has booked some dates throughout the South in a tour that will end around Christmas. Although his distinctive brand of bespoke, classically infused jazz is popular with white audiences, he’s not taking any chances: He hires Tony to act both as chauffeur and protector should any difficulties, embarrassments or less-than-enjoyable circumstances arise.

The ensuing journey unfolds much as the audience might expect: The slovenly, tough-talkin’ Tony and the quiet, impeccably mannered “Dr. Shirley” almost immediately begin to bicker about everything from the music Tony listens to in the car to the cigarettes he smokes between his incessant chatter. But Green Book, which was co-written by Vallelonga’s son Nick, turns out to be much more than The Odd Couple meets Driving Miss Daisy. Surely Nick’s own intimate knowledge of the real-life lead players helps lend Green Book its sense of groundedness, not to mention the distinctive characters of two larger-than-life men. What’s more, it makes sure to give the audience permission to laugh, even as the stakes of Shirley’s trip become dangerously high.

As might be expected, Tony and Dr. Shirley meet their fair share of physical danger in Green Book, but it’s the psychic blows that wound the most: Although at first the uncouth Tony may not understand Dr. Shirley’s genius at the piano — as well as his sophisticated sense of etiquette and comportment — even he can recognize the hypocrisy of applauding someone’s talent one minute, then relegating him to an outdoor lavatory the next. But it’s not as if Dr. Shirley is any more at home among the mostly black servers, bartenders and domestic staff that he encounters in a world where a man like him — black, brilliantly educated and, one scene suggests, gay — can find little if any purchase.

It will surprise no one to learn that both Tony and Dr. Shirley undergo powerful transformations in Green Book, which begins with a scene of Tony throwing out two water glasses used by black workmen hired by his wife, Dolores (Linda Cardellini), and which also includes a scene of Tony encouraging his ever-so-proper employer to eat a piece of fried chicken with his hands. If that image sounds horribly cringeworthy, it’s a tribute to director Peter Farrelly and to Mortensen and Ali that what could be a fatally misbegotten exercise winds up being unexpectedly warm and amusing.

Farrelly, best known for directing such comedies as Dumb and Dumber and There’s Something About Mary with his brother Bobby, has never been known as subtle, or for caring much about what his movies looked like. But Green Book is an exceptionally pleasant experience, both visually and aurally, photographed in rich period hues by Sean Porter and drenched in gorgeous music by both Shirley and composer Kris Bowers. It was Bowers, reportedly, who coached Ali in the finger movements that look so convincing in the film, especially during a fabulously boisterous interlude set at a hopping juke joint.

But all the technical prowess in the world wouldn’t be able to overcome iffy casting in a film that lives or dies by its two central performances. In that regard, Mortensen and Ali take ownership of Green Book early on and make it entirely theirs. Mortensen has always been an appealing, versatile actor, but here he discovers untold layers of humor (and belly fat) to lean in to Tony’s alternately grating and hilarious naivete. Playing off Mortensen’s expansive lack of self-consciousness, Ali is all controlled interior, communicating as much in a glance or a raised finger as with a pages-long monologue.

The cumulative result of so many things going for it is that Green Book fires on all cylinders, creating the kind of satisfying mainstream moviegoing experience that many observers thought Hollywood had forgotten how to make. There was a time when Green Book might have been the tale of a racist-with-a-heart-of-gold being redeemed by a too-good-to-be-true African-American shaman or self-sacrificing paragon. No one is redeemed here, just given space to develop mutual respect and affection. The great success of Green Book lies in its modesty, and the straightforward way it recognizes seismic change in the incremental turning of a human heart.

https://www.tampabay.com/features/movies/green-book-is-the-rare-hollywood-crowd-pleaser-that-triumphs-on-all-counts-20181119/


New in theaters this week: ‘Bohemian Rhapsody,’ ‘The Nutcracker and the Four Realms,’ ‘Nobody’s Fool’

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OPENING FRIDAY:

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

Rami Malek stars as Freddie Mercury, the late lead singer of the British rock band Queen. With Lucy Boynton, Ben Hardy, Aidan Gillen, Tom Hollander, Allen Leach and Mike Myers. Directed by Bryan Singer. (144 minutes, PG-13)

<URL destination=”http://tampabay.com/things-to-do/music/the-queen-movie-bohemian-rhapsody-survives-impossible-task-of-re-creating-freddie-mercury-20181031/”>READ MORE: The Queen movie ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ survives impossible task of re-creating Freddie Mercury

THE NUTCRACKER AND THE FOUR REALMS

A teenage girl (Mackenzie Foy, left) must brave a magical and dangerous parallel world in this star-studded reinvention of the classic fairy tale. With Keira Knightley, Eugenio Derbez, Matthew Macfadyen, Richard E. Grant, Miranda Hart, Misty Copeland, Helen Mirren and Morgan Freeman. Directed by Lasse Hallstrom and Joe Johnston. (99 minutes, PG)

NOBODY’S FOOL

In about her 100th movie of the year, Tiffany Haddish, center, plays a young woman just out of jail reconnecting her straight-arrow sister (Tika Sumpter, right) in this comedy. With Omari Hardwick, Mehcad Brooks, Amber Riley and Whoopi Goldberg. Written and directed by Tyler Perry. (110 minutes, R)

SUSPIRIA

A dark force encompasses an elite dance company. With Dakota Johnson, above, Tilda Swinton, Mia Goth, Lutz Ebersdorf, Jessica Harper and Chloe Grace Moretz. Directed by Luca Guadagnino. (152 minutes, R)

THE HAPPY PRINCE

Rupert Everett stars in, wrote and directed this tale of Oscar Wilde in his final days reflecting on his life. With Colin Firth, Colin Morgan, Edwin Thomas and Emily Watson. Opens at AMC Woodland Square 20 in Oldsmar and AMC Veterans 24 in Tampa. (105 minutes, R)

NOW PLAYING:

Free Solo

This well-reviewed documentary (98 percent fresh on Rotten Tomatoes) follows Alex Honnold as he becomes the first person to free solo climb Yosemite’s 3,000-foot high El Capitan Wall. With no ropes or safety gear, he completed arguably the greatest feat in rock climbing history. Directed by E. Chai Vasarhelyi. Now playing at AMC Sundial 20 in St. Petersburg and Regal Park Place Stadium 16 in Pinellas Park, opens today at Tampa Theatre. (97 minutes, PG-13)

SING-ALONG: THE GREATEST SHOWMAN

The sleeper hit of sing-along movies at Tampa Theatre returns this weekend. The theater usually has us singing along to Disney classics or yesteryear favorites, so it’s a nice change to see 2017’s The Greatest Showman in the lineup. Several previous sing-alongs to the movie have sold out, so get on those tickets ($13, $10 members). The unapologetically old-fashioned musical starring Hugh Jackman as P.T. Barnum includes the Oscar-nominated This Is Me, a rousing ode to anyone who has ever felt marginalized, sung by the bearded lady (Keala Settle). 2 p.m. Saturday. Tampa Theatre, 711 Franklin St., Tampa. (813) 274-8982. tampatheatre.org.

CriticS’ picks

mHalloween: Four decades after the original terrified and grossed out moviegoers, the franchise springs back to life with Jamie Lee Curtis back as Laurie Strose, the only survivor of Michael Myers’ first killing rampage.

The Hate U Give: A teen (Amandla Stenberg) witnesses a police shooting and navigates its fallout in her mostly white prep school and her African-American neighborhood.

A Star Is Born: Bradley Cooper headlines with Lady Gaga and makes his directorial debut with this remake of the venerable love story about rising and falling showbiz careers.

UPCOMING RELEASES

All dates subject to change.

Nov. 9: The Girl in the Spider’s Web; The Grinch; Overlord; Beautiful Boy; Prospect

Nov. 16: Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald; Widows; Instant Family; At Eternity’s Gate; Boy Erased

Nov. 21: Creed II; Ralph Breaks the Internet; Robin Hood

Dec. 7: Mary Queen of Scots; Anna and the Apocalypse

Dec. 14: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse; Mortal Engines; The Mule

Dec. 19: Mary Poppins Returns

Dec. 21: Aquaman; Bumblebee; Welcome to Marwen; Second Act

Dec. 25: Holmes & Watson; Vice

https://www.tampabay.com/features/movies/new-in-theaters-this-week-bohemian-rhapsody-the-nutcracker-and-the-four-realms-nobodys-fool-20181031/


Here’s a guide to the authors coming to the Times Festival of Reading

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For many of the authors appearing at the Times Festival of Reading, books are a means to chronicle injustice — and perhaps help to make a change.

In fiction and nonfiction, poetry and books for young readers, writers employ their literary art to examine such issues as racism, misogyny and environmental degradation. Telling a story can shine a light in darkness, opening the eyes, minds and hearts of readers. Words can move us to actions, small and large. The 26th annual festival is 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday on the campus of the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, 140 Seventh Ave. S. Admission is free; books for sale on site. Find a full schedule at festivalofreading.com.

• Civil rights historian Raymond Arsenault chronicles the life of a sports icon and activist.

• In his eighth Quinn Colson novel, Ace Atkins amps up the action in a little Mississippi town.

• Sorboni Banerjee, Andre Frattino, Lauren Gibaldi and Fred Koehler will keep young readers turning the pages.

• Families face crises in debut novels by C. Morgan Babst and Melanie Hobson.

• Short story collections by two Florida writers reveal different perspectives on the everyday.

Christian Blauvelt brings life lessons from Star Wars.

Karen Browns novel is a chilling literary ghost story.

Robert Olen Butlers historical spy thriller takes readers to Paris during World War I.

• Writing coach Roy Peter Clark returns to the festival.

Tom Clavin co-authors a lively, revealing account of our first presidents military career.

Jack E. Davis book has won accolades that include the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for history.

• The festival is proud to present poets Erica Dawson, Tyler Gillespie, Peter Meinke and Enid Shomer.

Bill DeYoung recounts the life of a music legend with Florida roots.

Kristen Hare presents a book about being a tourist close to home.

Jean Heller and Cheryl Hollon bring back their series sleuths.

Jeffery Hess and Danny Lopez find rich sources for crime fiction in Florida.

Ladee Hubbard writes about a most unusual road trip in her debut novel.

Tayari Jones wrote a novel about a life-changing event and found her own life changed.

Gilbert King recounts a tragic true story of injustice in Florida.

Steve Kistulentzs debut novel is a story of family, politics and a plane crash.

• More Real Florida from Jeff Klinkenberg — this time its personal.

Michael Korytas latest thriller is a dark, satisfying puzzle.

• Florida plays a lead role in Eleanor Krisemans first novel.

Hugh LaFollette takes a complex look at an oversimplified issue.

• Bet on Gale Masseys psychological thriller for a winning read.

Joyce Maynard tells the story of her own heartbreaking romance.

• Step back and let Ben Montgomery tell you the story of a record-breaking stunt.

G. Neris latest is a graphic biography of a woman and the horse she risked everything for.

David Pedreieras murder mystery is out of this world.

Deborah Plant helped bring a previously unpublished book by Zora Neale Hurston to print.

Steph Post lights up rural Florida in a noir thriller.

Lori Roy finds dark material for a crime novel in Florida history.

B.A. Shapiro draws fictional portraits of Matisse, Stein and more.

• Adolescence is a battleground in David Smalls graphic novel.

Gary Shteyngart turns a satirical eye on America with novel about hedge fund manager on a Greyhound road trip.

• Get swept up in James Swains fast-paced tale of a teen stalked by serial killers.

• A young widow questions her safety and sanity in Lisa Ungers latest.

Rick Wilber writes tales of World War II, with a twist.

https://www.tampabay.com/features/books/heres-a-guide-to-the-authors-coming-to-the-times-festival-of-reading-20181116/


LOVE and other passions: Robert Indiana’s sculpture retrospective at the Tampa Museum of Art

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TAMPA — Robert Indiana’s iconic LOVE sculpture is one of the most recognizable pieces of American artwork. But the success of LOVE tended to overshadow the body of work that Indiana created over the span of more than half a century.

Until now. “Robert Indiana: A Sculpture Retrospective” is on display at the Tampa Museum of Art.

Organized by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, N.Y., where it debuted over the summer, the exhibition reveals paintings, prints, early assemblages and sculptures.

The exhibition was intended as a celebration of Indiana’s 90th birthday, which would have been in September. But Indiana died in May, before the exhibition opened in Buffalo.

Not only does the retrospective expose so much of Indiana’s work, but it decodes loads of symbolism. It also makes clear how much America factored into Indiana’s work and psyche.

Of course, there are LOVE sculptures. A red metal LOVE sculpture greets you in the lobby as soon as you walk through the museum’s entrance. It’s exciting to be in the presence of this American icon, with its sassy tilted O and bold red letters with green and blue interiors.

Upstairs, more LOVE sculptures are found, including ones made of marble, which have never been exhibited before. There’s a huge chrome statue in the Hebrew word for love, ahava, and one of red travertine that says amor, love in Spanish. They’re all exquisite and the way they’ve been arranged together gives maximum photo potential.

But, the exhibition points out, creating such a widely recognized symbol proved problematic for Indiana. He originally created it as a Christmas card for the Museum of Modern Art. His first sketches of the arrangement of letters are included in the exhibit. He had never copyrighted the image, and by the time he had conceived the first sculpture in 1966, the design had been rampantly poached, a practice that continues today. Indiana believed the success of the image was the reason his reputation in the New York art world was ruined.

Yet he continued to reproduce LOVE, although the ones he made in marble were significant to him in the context of art history because the material was used in sculptures of antiquity. And if you had one image to be associated with for eternity, the longevity of marble makes it the go-to material.

Still, there is so much more to Robert Indiana than LOVE.

Born in Indiana as Robert Clark, Indiana moved to New York to pursue art in the late 1950s. His studio was in a neighborhood called the Slips, a former shipyard in lower Manhattan. A broke and clever artist, Indiana would scavenge the dilapidated warehouses there for materials, including masts from 19th century ships, and created assemblages from them.

These early assemblages were based on the concept of “herms,” statues from ancient Greece of the god Hermes. The statues are signified by only having a head and a phallus — no arms or legs. Indiana’s herms aren’t overtly sexual, although some do possess conspicuously placed pegs. They have wheels, words, stars and numbers on them, the personal symbols that Indiana had begun incorporating into all of his work.

Symbolism became central to Indiana’s body of work from then on. He had become infatuated with the concept of the American dream as a youth, somewhat cynically, seeing it as a cliche. But he began to consider the optimistic struggle to achieve the dream, and attached the words “hug,” “eat,” “die” and “err” to it.

Wheels represent the cycle of life and he adopted a star as a personal symbol for himself. Numbers have specific meanings and also represent the circle of life, as do colors, all of which appear in his paintings, prints and assemblages. They are often self-portraits. The themes repeat in the various mediums, making a striking installation of bold graphics and vibrant color.

The number-color connection started with a series of paintings in 1965. A series from a private collection, Exploding Numbers, is included in the exhibition. Indiana also created metal sculptures of numbers 1 through 0, with 0 filling in for 10, also on display. Numbers had intrigued him since childhood and he developed a system linking these numbers to stages of life, assigning colors to those stages. One represents birth and is red and blue. He associated red with his father, who worked for Phillips 66, whose company logo was red. Two was his favorite number because it takes two to create life, and he often represented it in green and blue, the colors of nature. He had a strong dislike for 4 (it was “too square”), but considered 5 the prime of life and painted it red, white and blue, reinforcing the concept of the American dream. Nine is painted in colors of danger — yellow and black — because it’s nearing the end of life. And 0 signifies death, represented in ash gray or white.

In the 1970s, Indiana created a series of self-portraits entirely from symbols that signified events from the 1960s. In Decade: Autoportrait 1961 (1972-1977), a number 1 (Indiana) overlaps a star (also Indiana), both encapsulated in a circle (cyclicity). Indiana is emblazoned across the bottom with USA, and the word bar refers to Alfred Barr, the MOMA curator behind Indiana’s first museum acquisition in 1961.

Indiana retreated from New York in 1978 to Vinalhaven, Maine, where he lived out the rest of his days at a Victorian lodge named the Star of Hope. He continued to produce, still riffing on his same themes. The exhibition includes some of his sensational painted bronzes, replicas of previous wooden sculptures that are impossible to differentiate.

The last piece Indiana worked on, The Electric American Dream (2017), is included in the exhibition. The words central to Indiana’s life’s work are emblazoned on black circles and light up in repeated patterns.

Hug, Eat, Die, Err.

Contact Maggie Duffy at [email protected] Follow @maggiedalexis.

https://www.tampabay.com/things-to-do/visualarts/love-and-other-passions-robert-indianas-sculpture-retrospective-at-the-tampa-museum-of-art-20181116/


At 24, violinist Esther Yoo is already making a mark in the music world

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TAMPA — Esther Yoo should be tired. The night before, she was playing in London’s Cadogan Hall. Now she was in a dressing room at the David A. Straz Jr. Center for the Performing Arts. Only the time change made this seems normal, allowing her to land in Tampa Wednesday evening.

But Yoo, 24, is used to the schedule, which has demanded she play as many as eight cities in three continents in the same week. It’s the price of being this good. The Korean-American violinist won the first-ever residency given by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, finishing Wednesday with Felix Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto. She will perform the same piece today with the Florida Orchestra, on a 1704 “Prince Obolensky” Stradivarius.

“This life as a musician is something I’ve dreamed about since I was a really little kid,” Yoo said. “Having such a big dream from such a long time ago, and to be living that and experiencing that now, is something that I never forget. I never forget how much I wanted to do that as a kid and how much I still want to do that.”

She keeps her Instagram followers up to date with postings, often sprinkled with up to more than 20 hashtags. She’s comfortable with horses in a pasture (#sunset #happiness#weekend #nature #horses #clouds #relax #beauty #love). She’s comfortable at this year’s screening of On Chesil Beach, which features her in the score (#nyc # glamsquad #redlips #pearls). She likes sharing positive thoughts from life on the road.

“There are many people who can’t always be at the concert halls,” she said, “and to be able to show a little bit of that through Instagram or Facebook or YouTube is quite a fun thing to do.”

That kind of wide-ranging audience connection makes Yoo contemporary, said Michael Francis, the orchestra’s music director.

“She is understanding what it takes to be a serious violinist in the 21st century,” Francis said. “It’s not the same as it was 50, 60 years ago. She is one of the new generation, understanding that the role of the solo violinist is not just to turn up and play. But instead to be part of it.”

Yoo has also reached out directly to young people, including through the Nordoff Robbins music therapy charity and an eating disorders program at the Phoenix Centre.

You wouldn’t know it from someone who holds eye contact and speaks in unbroken, easy sentences, but Yoo said she struggled with shyness growing up. Talking to strangers was terrifying.

“Breaking the ice was tough for me. I think that’s kind of why I gravitated toward my instrument through music, because that felt like something safe. It felt like a safe language and it felt like something I could connect with very easily.”

Born in the Warren, N.J., area, she started playing the violin at age 4. Her parents, both computer scientists, took her to concerts at Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall. Afterwards they browsed the former Tower Records store, with the faces of musicians they had just watched on the covers of CDs.

“That was also in part what inspired me to become a recording artist myself,” she said.

After moving to Belgium at age 6, she studied in Germany. She speaks French, Korean and German and is studying Mandarin. Accolades have accumulated since childhood. She won the International Sibelius Violin Competition at age 16, the youngest prize winner in the competition’s history. She achieved a similar feat two years later, becoming one of the youngest prizewinners of the Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels. This year, Classic FM named her one of the website’s “30 incredible classical musicians under 30.”

“She has tremendous technical facility, as well as instinctive musical feeling,” Francis said. “And when you combine that little bit of special stardust, then you have the complete package.”

With all of that, Yoo’s journey has taken her away from perfectionism and toward self-reliance. That goes not just for well-being, but for music as well.

“When I was younger I was very much a perfectionist, and in some ways I still am,” she said. “But I feel like now I have accepted that there is no such thing as perfection. You can’t please everyone, ever. And I think ultimately doing what you feel is right and what makes you happy is the most important thing. And I think that as you grow older you start to understand that. Understanding and being aware of your own voice is important. Getting to know yourself, and understanding and accepting facts about yourself is really important to develop as a musician and to find your voice through music as well.”

The film soundtrack is her third album. With the euphoric Royal Philharmonic stint behind her and a new year ahead, Yoo paused when asked how she would hashtag this moment.

“Excited,” she said.

Contact Andrew Meacham at [email protected] or (727) 892-2248. Follow @torch437.

https://www.tampabay.com/things-to-do/stage/at-24-violinist-esther-yoo-is-already-making-a-mark-in-the-music-world-20181116/


Violinist Esther Yoo dazzles with Florida Orchestra in Mendelssohn concerto

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TAMPA — Not a ton of people have heard of Ralph Vaughan Williams’ A London Symphony, the title piece in this weekend’s Florida Orchestra concert series. That might help explain why every seat at the David A. Straz Jr. Center for the Performing Arts on Friday was not taken. Nor is Sir Edward Elgar’s In the South a well known crowd pleaser in the mold of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5. Both are considered tone poems — more mood than story, a single movement, free of traditional exposition-development-recapitulation symphonic structure.

Yet both pieces helped bring England out from under the shadow of the countries that had a firmly established national brand, namely Germany, France and Russia. So music fans who skipped this concert missed out on a pair of sensual treats, each with a relatively uncommon bonus in extended viola solos.

Don’t get me wrong. Ferguson Hall at the Straz, smaller than the Morsani, was nearly full. But the second piece of the evening, Felix Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto, might be one audiences will look back on later with an “I-knew-her-when” nostalgia. Esther Yoo, just 24 and setting an impressive pace in performances around the world, played magnificently (and almost constantly) through the 26-minute piece famed for its warmth and celebratory spirit.

“She really seeks to communicate what the composer’s intentions are, which seems a very obvious thing to say,” music director Michael Francis said in an interview Thursday. “But actually it’s very important because otherwise, you can have people come in and put their ego on it and say, ‘Well, I want my version of Sibelius or my version of Tchaikovsky.’ What she’s trying to do is actually look at what’s being written and then make musical sense of it.”

Elgar’s inspiration came in a 1903 family vacation to a coastal Italian town (hence In the South is also commonly known as Alassio). This is a romantic explosion of short but emphatic musical sentences, a continual stream of ideas and moods. Woodwinds and strings expand and contract, one grieving, another consoling. A booming brass dominates, replaced by viola solo (by principal Derek Mosloff).

The Mendelssohn concerto begins in agitation and blossoms quickly into exquisite harmonies between soloist and orchestra. Yoo attacked its furious passages and emphasized its subtler dynamics just as much, every shift in tone. An unaccompanied cadenza showed off her technical skill while lovingly dissecting the composer’s themes, as if splitting atoms.

After three curtain calls before intermission, she performed an encore, an arrangement of a Korean folk song.

A London Symphony treats listeners to the sounds and moods of the city — awakening in the fog, bustling with intensity, the chimes of Big Ben or the occasional jingle of a horse-drawn taxicab. A sudden shift in horns and strings marks an underbelly of open secrets, the start of a complex message that ends with a wistful lamentation and hints of doom. The viola, clarinet, oboe and swelling brass and judicious percussion all contribute to a chill as a senescent city marks the end of an empire.

Contact Andrew Meacham at [email protected] or (727) 892-2248. Follow @torch437 .

IF YOU GO

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS ‘A LONDON SYMPHONY’

Concerts start at 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday at the Mahaffey Theater, 400 First St. S, St. Petersburg. A preconcert talk starts one hour before performances. $18-$48. (727) 892-3337. floridaorchestra.org.

https://www.tampabay.com/things-to-do/stage/violinist-esther-yoo-dazzles-with-florida-orchestra-in-mendelssohn-concerto-20181117/


The Zola Twitter saga went viral. The ‘Zola’ movie is being filmed in Tampa Bay.

Okay listen up. This story is long.

It was the first of nearly 150 tweets over a 48-hour period in October 2015, leading to a Twitter saga read by millions. A 19-year-old woman named Aziah “Zola” Wells told the story of her March 2015 weekend trip to Tampa. It involved stripping, forced prostitution, gun play and an attempted suicide.

Now the Twitter saga is becoming a movie called Zola. The production has been filming in the Tampa Bay area since Oct. 29, film commissioners from both sides of the bridge confirmed.

“We’ve wanted to keep it quiet out of respect for the production company,” St.Petersburg-Clearwater film commissioner Tony Armer. “They will be here through early December.”

Neither Armer nor Hillsborough County film commissioner Tyler Martinolich would say where the production is filming. So far, only private property has been used.

“All over the Tampa Bay area,” Armer said. “They are spreading the love.”

A24, which was behind the Academy Award-winning movie Moonlight, is producing the movie, according to IMDB.com. Janicza Bravo, whose breakout hit was the indie darling Lemon, directs. Taylour Paige stars as Zola.

Costar Riley Keough posted an Instagram story called “Trampa” that showed the movie’s stars dancing inside a ballroom. Costar Coleman Domingo shared a photo of himself lounging at a hotel at a place he labeled Clearwater Beach. Derica Cole and Nicole Suerez, listed on IMDB as costume designer and assistant costume designer, posted shots from Tampa’s Oxford Exchange.

The story told by Wells was based on real people and a real trip. The most salacious parts were made up.

It began in the Michigan Hooters where Wells worked when customer Jessica Swiatkowski invited her on a road trip to Tampa for a weekend of dancing in the city’s famous strip clubs. Going with them would be Swiatkowski’s boyfriend Jarrett Scott and friend Akporode “Rudy” Uwedjojevwe.

That much appears to be true.

Through the tweets, Wells then wrote that Swiatkowski was forced into prostitution by Uwedjojevwe, who also shot a rival pimp in the face, and that Jarrett attempted suicide by jumping from a hotel balcony.

Wells has admitted that the shooting and suicide attempt were made up. Swiatkowski has since denied she prostituted. Uwedjojevwe was later arrested for sexual assault and trafficking in an unrelated incident in Reno.

The tale took off on the internet as #TheStory. Ava DuVernay, Missy Elliot, Keke Palmer, Solange Knowles and other stars shared it. Movie studios vied for the rights to the story.

Zola presents a great opportunity to start a dialogue about the dangers of sex work,” Martinolich said, “while at the same time proving once again Florida is not lacking in unique and often colorful stories ripe for filmmakers to explore.”

This marks the second time A24 has filmed in the Tampa Bay area. The company also produced Spring Breakers, filmed in St. Petersburg in 2012.

Locals are part of the Zola cast and crew, the film commissioners said, but unless the production company applies for their county’s film incentives and turns in books, they cannot estimate numbers. Both counties give 10 percent back on what productions spend in-county and both have a $500,000 annual cap on what can be dolled out.

Unlike neighboring Georgia, Florida does not offer a state tax incentive to productions. That has caused movies like Live By Night, which takes place in Ybor City, and Gifted, set in St. Petersburg, to recreate those locales in Georgia.

But A24 made Moonlight in Miami without a state incentive and is doing the same with Zola here.

“A24 is a filmmaker-friendly company,” Armer said. “They will always do what is best for the film and the filmmaker.”

Contact Paul Guzzo at [email protected] or follow @PGuzzoTimes.

https://www.tampabay.com/features/movies/the-zola-twitter-saga-went-viral-the-zola-movie-is-being-filmed-in-tampa-bay-20181116/


Winter Village and skating rink return to downtown Tampa

Tags :

Category : Event , Tampa Bay

TAMPA — Perhaps fitting, Tampa’s coldest day of November will be accompanied by the return of its Winter Village.

Beginning at 5 p.m. and running until Jan. 5, the Winter Village at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park will officially return to downtown Tampa today, bringing its outdoor ice rink, shows and food vendors along with it.

To celebrate its opening night, the village announced it will offer free skating from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., followed by a big-screen showing of the classic film Home Alone.

Similar to years past, the village will feature 10 boutiques from local craftspeople and purveyors, as well as specialty drinks and treats to go with the 5,000 square feet of real ice.

New this year, however, will be the “Winter Village Express,” which will allow patrons to board a TECO Line Streetcar for a holiday-themed ride through the city. Riders can board the street car at Whiting Station or Centro Ybor. The ride will be offered on Sundays from Nov. 18 to Dec. 23, cost $5 a person and will offer treats, music, and activities during the non-stop trip.

While skating will be free on Friday, the price for patrons everyday after will be $14 a person for rental skates and 90 minutes of skating. Tickets can be purchased at the ice rink entrance. Hours to skate can be found here.

Other events that will be hosted at the village includes The City of Tampa Christmas tree lighting, which will take place on Nov. 30, with festivities beginning at 6:45 p.m. and the tree being lit at 7:25 p.m. The village will then play “The Santa Clause” on a big screen directly after, starting at 7:30 p.m.

The annual Santa Fest featuring the Downtown Tampa Holiday Parade will be on Dec. 1, beginning at Morgan and Madison Street.

Contact Josh Fiallo at [email protected] Follow @ByJoshFiallo.

https://www.tampabay.com/christmas/winter-village-and-skating-rink-return-to-downtown-tampa-20181116/


Top things to do in Tampa Bay for Saturday, Nov. 17

Tags :

Category : Event , Tampa Bay

St. Pete Beach BikeFest: The festival brings a free show by 38 Special, as well as an expo, vendors, a Roadkill Scavenger Bike Ride, competitions and nightly beach bar crawls. Parking available for motorcycles only ($10). Activities run until 2 a.m. daily. 10 a.m., TradeWinds Island Resorts, 5500 Gulf Blvd., St. Pete Beach. Free. Toll-free 1-800-360-4016; stpetebeachbikefest.com.

Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading: The festival’s 26th year brings authors including Ace Atkins (The Sinners), Jeff Klinkenberg (Son of Real Florida: Stories From My Life) and Lisa Unger (Under My Skin). See the full lineup at the festival’s website, festivalofreading.com. 10 a.m., University of South Florida St. Petersburg Campus, 140 Seventh Ave. S, St. Petersburg. Free. (727) 893-8111; stpt.usf.edu.

Kathleen Madigan: From multiple appearances on the late night circuit, to five stand up specials including three on Netflix, the comic brings her latest tour, Boxed Wine and Barefoot. 7 and 9:30 p.m., Capitol Theatre, 405 Cleveland St., Clearwater. $49-$59. (727) 791-7400.

Cedric the Entertainer: The Comedy Get Down Tour: The comic and actor is joined by fellow funnymen D.L. Hughley, George Lopez and Eddie Griffin. 7 p.m., MidFlorida Credit Union Amphitheatre, 4802 U.S. 301 N, Tampa. $25-$125. (813) 740-2446.

Science Friday: Science correspondent Ira Flatow hosts this 90-minute science based show that includes live music, props, video screenings and science demonstrations. 8 p.m., Tampa Theatre, 711 Franklin St., Tampa. $25-$50. (813) 274-8981.

Diavolo Dance Theatre: The troupe that appeared on America’s Got Talent combine dance and arcobatics amid skate ramps and abstract sculptures. 8 p.m., Carol Morsani Hall at the Straz Center for the Performing Arts, 1010 N MacInnes Place, Tampa. Start at $22.75. (813) 229-7827; strazcenter.org.

Chillounge Night: Illumination: Guests at the elegant outdoor party can dance in a wonderland of “glow” with a giant LED robot, illuminated swings, LED art and furniture, a Cleopatra daybed fashion parade, stilt walkers, fire dancers, stilt walkers and music by Smooth D and The Boyz and Kafkasso. Benefits Creative Clay. 21 or older only. 6 p.m., North Straub Park, Fifth Avenue NE and Bayshore Drive, St. Petersburg. $25 advance, $35 day of event, $120 VIP. (941) 448-0995; chilloungenight.com.

St. Pete Run Fest: The running festival features a 5K, 10K, half marathon, kids runs and a health and wellness expo. 7 a.m., Dali Museum, 1 Dali Blvd. (Bayshore Drive SE and Fifth Avenue SE), St. Petersburg. $40-$135. (727) 592-8108; stpeterunfest.org.

Largo Car Show: If it moves and it’s in Tampa Bay, it’s in this show. Also, electric vehicles on site for test drives. 9 a.m., Largo Central Park, 101 Central Park Drive, Largo. Free. (727) 587-6740, ext. 5046.

Shopapalooza: The annual Black Friday alternative event brings double the fun with two days of shopping local with almost 150 vendors, artists, and local businesses with specials, food and children’s entertainment. 10 a.m., Straub Park (Center), at Beach Drive and Fifth Avenue NE, St. Petersburg. Free (items individually priced). (727) 637-5586.

Pig Jam: The 17th annual celebration of barbecue features more than 70 teams competing to cook up the best barbecued ribs, plus brisket, chicken, with all the fixins’ available, live entertainment, rock climbing wall, moon walk, live music.. 10 a.m., Plant City Festival Grounds, 1401 Gordon Food Service Drive, Plant City. No cover. (813) 754-3707; plantcitypigjam.com.

CraftArt Festival: More than 120 fine craft artists from around the country will be on hand for this annual street festival with a children’s activity tent and an artists’ demonstration tent. From ceramic artists throwing on the wheel to glass blowing to wood turning, you can see the artists at work. 10 a.m., Florida CraftArt Galleries, 501 Central Ave., St. Petersburg. Free. (727) 821-7391; www.floridacraftart.org.

Suncoast Jazz Festival: The completely indoor festival spans five simultaneous venues between the Sheraton Sand Key and Marriott Sand Key. Dedicated Jolley Trolley lines allow attendees to move from one venue to another to hear bands playing styles spanning traditional jazz, big band, swing and zydeco. suncoastjazzfestival.com. 10 a.m., Sheraton Sand Key Resort, 1160 Gulf Blvd., Clearwater Beach. $25-$50, $135 three day package. (727) 248-9441; sheratonsandkey.com.

Atreyu: California metalcore act will perform on its In Our Wake tour alongside special guests Memphis May Fire and Ice Nine Kills. 5 p.m., Ritz Ybor, 1503 E Seventh Ave., Tampa. $23.50. (813) 247-2555; ritzybor.com.

Carl LaBove: One of the original Outlaws of Comedy, the veteran comic has also appeared on the Tonight Show, Seinfeld and Roseanne. 6, 8 and 10:30 p.m., Side Splitters Comedy Club, 12938 N Dale Mabry Highway, Tampa. $10-$16.50. (813) 960-1197; sidesplitterscomedy.com.

Michaele Graves: Former Misfits singer will perform along with opening performances from with Argyle Goolsby and Nim Vind. 7 p.m., The Brass Mug, 1450 Skipper Road, Tampa. Free. (813) 972-8152.

Damon Williams: He’s appeared on BET Live, Comedy Central’s Premium Blend, HBO’s Def Comedy Jam and P. Diddy’s Bad Boys of Comedy. 7:30 and 10 p.m., Improv Comedy Theater, 1600 E Eighth Ave., Tampa. $15-$17. (813) 864-4000; improvtampa.com.

Mike McCarthy: The high-energy Boston-born comic is nicknamed “the Comedy Barbarian.” 9:30 p.m., Coconuts Comedy Club at MJ’s, 5501 Gulf Blvd., St. Pete Beach. $20. (727) 360-5653.

KIDS AND FAMILY

Super American Circus: Comic daredevil Bello Nock bring us a new age, one ring circus with edgier acts including the Wheel of Destiny, the Flying Royals, the Motorcycle Globe of Death and a Human Cannonball Shot. 1, 4:30 and 8 p.m., Florida State Fairgrounds, 4802 U.S. 301 N, Tampa. $20, $8 child. (941) 870-7444. floridastatefair.com.

Pinocchio: St. Petersburg Opera presents the classic fairy tale with music by Mozart, Verdi and Offenbach. 7 p.m., Opera Central, Preis Hall, 2145 First Ave. S, St. Petersburg. $5-$10.

Water Ski Show: Skiers ages 6 to 60 perform theatrical water shows similar to those seen at Cypress Gardens. All performances include barefoot, jump, ballet, adagio and pyramid acts. Come early for a pre-show. 4 p.m., Tower Lake, 130 Burbank Road, Oldsmar. Free. (727) 480-9365; tampawaterski.com.

Sports Card Show: A collection of baseball, basketball, football and hockey cards with memorabilia, autographs, comics, Pokemon and Yu-Gi-Oh supplies. 8 a.m., Big Top Flea Market, 9250 E Fowler Ave., Thonotosassa. Free. (813) 380-7676; tampacardshow.com.

Sanding Ovations Sand Sculpting Competition and Festival: This annual competition brings master sand sculptors who work for hours to build works of art using 150 tons of sand. Fireworks at 10 p.m. Saturday. Entertainment includes Kerry Courtney (2 p.m.), Cicada Rhythm (3:45 p.m.), Bobby Lee Rodgers Trio (5:15 p.m.), Railway Kings (7 p.m.) and Pirate Flag (8:45 p.m.). 8 a.m., Treasure Island Beach Trail Park, 10400 Gulf Blvd., Treasure Island. Free. (727) 547-4575, ext. 237; mytreasureisland.org.

Christmas Town at Busch Gardens: More than 2 million twinkling lights transform the park into a holiday wonderland. Included with admission through Dec. 31. 10 a.m., Busch Gardens, 10165 N McKinley Drive, Tampa. $104, 2 and younger free. Save $15 if you order online. (813) 884-4386; www.buschgardens.com.

Sunset Cinema at Pier 60: Bring blankets or low lawn chairs to watch Daddy’s Home 2 on a jumbo sized screen. No alcohol. Shows start around dusk. 5:45 p.m., Pier 60, 10 Pier 60 Drive, Clearwater Beach. Free. (727) 449-1036; sunsetsatpier60.com.

Tampa Bay New Car and Truck Show: See the latest innovations in vehicles from trucks and cars to exotics. 10 a.m., Tampa Convention Center, 333 S Franklin St., Tampa. $12, $5 seniors/military, 12 and younger free. (513) 404-2545; AutoShowTampa.com.

TO WATCH

Christmas at Graceland, 8 p.m., Hallmark: Kellie Pickler plays a Chicago-based business executive traveling to Memphis for work. Of course, she runs into her old flame (Wes Brown). You fill in the blanks. (8 p.m., Hallmark).

MORE TO EXPLORE

Find more fun family events at tampabay.com/things-to-do.

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Top things to do in Tampa Bay for Sunday, Nov. 18

Tags :

Category : Event , Tampa Bay

Super American Circus: Comic daredevil Bello Nock bring us a new age, one ring circus with edgier acts including the Wheel of Destiny, the Flying Royals, the Motorcycle Globe of Death and a Human Cannonball Shot. 1, 4 and 7 p.m., Florida State Fairgrounds, 4802 U.S. 301 N, Tampa. $20, $8 child. (941) 870-7444; floridastatefair.com.

Petula Clark: Legendary multi-Grammy award winning British singer and actress known for her hit song Downtown, which debuted at No. 1, will perform. 5 p.m., Capitol Theatre, 405 Cleveland St., Clearwater. $39-$69. (727) 791-7400.

Livingston Taylor: Iconic singer-songwriter whose 50 year career encompasses a range of musical genres from folk, pop, jazz, gospel, and is known for upbeat storytelling, touching ballads and even full orchestra performances. 8 p.m., Murray Theatre at the Marcia P. Hoffman School of the Arts at Ruth Eckerd Hall, 1111 N McMullen-Booth Road, Clearwater. $42.50 and $55. (727) 712-2706.

Suncoast Jazz Festival: The completely indoor festival spans five simultaneous venues between the Sheraton Sand Key and Marriott Sand Key. Dedicated Jolley Trolley lines allow attendees to move from one venue to another to hear bands playing styles spanning traditional jazz, big band, swing and zydeco. suncoastjazzfestival.com. 9 a.m., Sheraton Sand Key Resort, 1160 Gulf Blvd., Clearwater Beach. $25-$50, $135 three day package. (727) 248-9441; sheratonsandkey.com.

CraftArt Festival: More than 120 fine craft artists from around the country will be on hand for this annual street festival with a children’s activity tent and an artists’ demonstration tent. From ceramic artists throwing on the wheel to glass blowing to wood turning, you can see the artists at work. 10 a.m., Florida CraftArt Galleries, 501 Central Ave., St. Petersburg. Free. (727) 821-7391; floridacraftart.org.

No Second Chances: A book talk, and possible comedy and guitar entertainment, by Don Bruns, author of No Second Chances, the third book in the Quentin Archer series. 1:30 p.m., Seminole Community Library, 9200 113th St. N, Seminole. Free. (727) 505-3634; .spcollege.edu/se/campus/library/index.htm.

St. Petersburg Tellabration: Popular area storytellers share their talents with the audience. Takes place in part the global storytelling celebration. 1:30 p.m., [email protected], 620 First Ave. S, St. Petersburg. $10. (727) 895-6620; thestudioat620.org.

Pinocchio: St. Petersburg Opera presents the classic fairy tale with music by Mozart, Verdi and Offenbach. 2 p.m., Opera Central, Preis Hall, 2145 First Ave. S, St. Petersburg. $5-$10..

St. Pete Run Fest: The running festival features a 5K, 10K, half marathon, kids runs and a health and wellness expo. 7 a.m., Dali Museum, 1 Dali Blvd. (Bayshore Drive SE and Fifth Avenue SE), St. Petersburg. $40-$135. (727) 592-8108; tpeterunfest.org.

Sports Card Show: A collection of baseball, basketball, football and hockey cards with memorabilia, autographs, comics, Pokemon and Yu-Gi-Oh supplies. 8 a.m., Big Top Flea Market, 9250 E Fowler Ave., Thonotosassa. Free. (813) 380-7676; tampacardshow.com.

Italian Film Festival: Catch the screening of six Italian cinema modern classics, spread over two days. Films include La kryptonite nella borsa (2 p.m.), Occhi chiusi (4 p.m.) and Il giovane favoloso (6 p.m.). 2 p.m., TECO Theater at the Straz Center for the Performing Arts, 1010 N MacInnes Place, Tampa. Free. (813) 229-7827; strazcenter.org.

Young Nudy and Sahbabii : Up and coming rappers will perform on their Nudy Land and Anime World tour. 6:30 p.m., The Orpheum, 1915 E Seventh Ave., Ybor City. $25-$40. (813) 248-9500; www.theorpheum.com.

Carl LaBove: One of the original Outlaws of Comedy, the veteran comic has also appeared on the Tonight Show, Seinfeld and Roseanne. 7 p.m., Side Splitters Comedy Club, 12938 N Dale Mabry Highway, Tampa. $10-$16.50. (813) 960-1197; sidesplitterscomedy.com.

Damon Williams: He’s appeared on BET Live, Comedy Central’s Premium Blend, HBO’s Def Comedy Jam and P. Diddy’s Bad Boys of Comedy. 7 p.m., Improv Comedy Theater, 1600 E Eighth Ave., Tampa. $15-$17. (813) 864-4000; improvtampa.com.

KIDS AND FAMILY

Sanding Ovations Sand Sculpting Competition and Festival: This annual competition brings master sand sculptors who work for hours to build works of art using 150 tons of sand. This year, artists come from North America, Europe and Asia. Entertainment includes Florida Folk Show with Pete Gallagher (noon), HoneyWhat (2 p.m.) and Roosevelt Collier Trio (3:45 p.m.). 10 a.m., Treasure Island Beach Trail Park, 10400 Gulf Blvd., Treasure Island. Free. (727) 547-4575, ext. 237; mytreasureisland.org.

Tampa Bay New Car and Truck Show: See the latest innovations in vehicles from trucks and cars to exotics. 10 a.m., Tampa Convention Center, 333 S Franklin St., Tampa. $12, $5 seniors/military, 12 and younger free. (513) 404-2545; AutoShowTampa.com.

MORE TO EXPLORE

Find more ways to get outdoors at tampabay.com/things-to-do.

https://www.tampabay.com/things-to-do/weekend-planner/top-things-to-do-in-tampa-bay-for-sunday-nov-18-20181116/


Upcoming Events

  1. Miami/Brickell Festival of the Arts

    October 20, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - January 15, 2019 @ 6:00 pm UTC+0
  2. Comedian Gerry Dee World Comedy Tour in Naples, Florida

    November 21 @ 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm UTC+0
  3. Ocala Balloon Glow

    November 23 @ 5:00 pm - November 25 @ 10:00 pm UTC+0
  4. 9th Annual Shopapalooza Festival, Part 2

    November 24 @ 10:00 am - 5:00 pm UTC+0
  5. Lake Helen Christmas Parade & Santa’s Village

    November 24 @ 4:00 pm - 9:00 pm UTC+0
  6. Christmas in the Country – Lights Display, Hay Ride & Festival

    November 24 @ 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm UTC+0
  7. Soul Beach: The Outdoor R&b / Jazz Concert & Comedy Show on the Water

    November 24 @ 7:30 pm - November 25 @ 1:00 am UTC+0
  8. 15th Annual X-Country Marathon, 30K, Half-Marathon & 5K

    November 25 @ 7:30 am - 2:30 pm UTC+0
  9. FREE TICKETS! Tampa Improv 11/27 Stand Up Comedy Show

    November 27 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm UTC+0
  10. FL Orchestra Happy Hour Concert – Nov 28

    November 28 @ 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm UTC+0

Upcoming Events

  1. Miami/Brickell Festival of the Arts

    October 20, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - January 15, 2019 @ 6:00 pm UTC+0
  2. Comedian Gerry Dee World Comedy Tour in Naples, Florida

    November 21 @ 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm UTC+0
  3. Ocala Balloon Glow

    November 23 @ 5:00 pm - November 25 @ 10:00 pm UTC+0
  4. 9th Annual Shopapalooza Festival, Part 2

    November 24 @ 10:00 am - 5:00 pm UTC+0
  5. Lake Helen Christmas Parade & Santa’s Village

    November 24 @ 4:00 pm - 9:00 pm UTC+0
  6. Christmas in the Country – Lights Display, Hay Ride & Festival

    November 24 @ 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm UTC+0
  7. Soul Beach: The Outdoor R&b / Jazz Concert & Comedy Show on the Water

    November 24 @ 7:30 pm - November 25 @ 1:00 am UTC+0
  8. 15th Annual X-Country Marathon, 30K, Half-Marathon & 5K

    November 25 @ 7:30 am - 2:30 pm UTC+0
  9. FREE TICKETS! Tampa Improv 11/27 Stand Up Comedy Show

    November 27 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm UTC+0
  10. FL Orchestra Happy Hour Concert – Nov 28

    November 28 @ 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm UTC+0

Join our Fun Network

  1. Miami/Brickell Festival of the Arts

    October 20, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - January 15, 2019 @ 6:00 pm UTC+0
  2. Comedian Gerry Dee World Comedy Tour in Naples, Florida

    November 21 @ 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm UTC+0
  3. Ocala Balloon Glow

    November 23 @ 5:00 pm - November 25 @ 10:00 pm UTC+0
  4. 9th Annual Shopapalooza Festival, Part 2

    November 24 @ 10:00 am - 5:00 pm UTC+0
  5. Lake Helen Christmas Parade & Santa’s Village

    November 24 @ 4:00 pm - 9:00 pm UTC+0
  6. Christmas in the Country – Lights Display, Hay Ride & Festival

    November 24 @ 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm UTC+0
  7. Soul Beach: The Outdoor R&b / Jazz Concert & Comedy Show on the Water

    November 24 @ 7:30 pm - November 25 @ 1:00 am UTC+0
  8. 15th Annual X-Country Marathon, 30K, Half-Marathon & 5K

    November 25 @ 7:30 am - 2:30 pm UTC+0
  9. FREE TICKETS! Tampa Improv 11/27 Stand Up Comedy Show

    November 27 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm UTC+0
  10. FL Orchestra Happy Hour Concert – Nov 28

    November 28 @ 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm UTC+0